Catholic church – Garibaldi Rosario http://garibaldirosario.org/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 12:11:23 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://garibaldirosario.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-69.png Catholic church – Garibaldi Rosario http://garibaldirosario.org/ 32 32 Pope appoints first cardinal of the Amazon rainforest https://garibaldirosario.org/pope-appoints-first-cardinal-of-the-amazon-rainforest/ Fri, 01 Jul 2022 12:10:35 +0000 https://garibaldirosario.org/pope-appoints-first-cardinal-of-the-amazon-rainforest/ RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — When Archbishop of the Brazilian city of Manaus Leonardo Steiner kneels before Pope Francis on August 27, the Brazilian cleric will go down in history as the first cardinal to come from the Amazon region. . “Communities feel that the distance between Rome and the Amazon is now smaller,” Steiner […]]]>

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — When Archbishop of the Brazilian city of Manaus Leonardo Steiner kneels before Pope Francis on August 27, the Brazilian cleric will go down in history as the first cardinal to come from the Amazon region. .

“Communities feel that the distance between Rome and the Amazon is now smaller,” Steiner told The Associated Press in a written interview. “Perhaps this is the reason for the joy of the Amazon people at Pope Francis’ decision.”

Steiner attributed his selection to four priorities of the pope: the desire to do more missionary work in the Amazon and to be attentive to the poor; caring for the Amazon “as our common home” and being a Church that “knows how to contribute to the autonomy of indigenous peoples”.

Spanning nine countries, the Amazon region is larger than the European Union. It is home to 34 million people, including more than three million indigenous people, belonging to about 400 ethnic groups, according to the Catholic Church.


There is a religious lens through which to view the acute environmental struggles also unfolding in the region: The Catholic Church’s socio-environmental agenda is a contentious issue with many Brazilian Pentecostal churches. These have a powerful caucus in the Brazilian parliament and have passed the pro-agribusiness beef caucus in Congress. Pentecostals and beef industry advocates belong to President Jair Bolsonaro’s far-right political base.

Cardinals are the most senior clergy under the pope. Often referred to as “red hats” because of the color of their caps, they serve as papal advisers. More importantly, together they select every pope, the leader of the world’s 1.3 billion Catholics.

For Church watchers, it will come as no surprise that Francis eventually appointed an Amazonian cardinal, given the importance the region had to his papacy and the attention he gave it.

THE ENVIRONMENTAL AWAKENING OF POPE FRANCIS

Francis was first moved by the fate of the vast Amazon basin in 2007, during the conference of the Episcopal Council of Latin American Bishops, according to Brazilian priest and historian José Oscar Beozzo. Francis was at that time the Archbishop of Buenos Aires and helped write the official record of the conference. The final text pleads for the preservation of the Amazon and Antarctica.

Francis went on to consecrate an entire synod, or meeting, of the region’s bishops in 2019. In his environmental awakening, crystallized in his 2015 encyclical “Praised be,” he pleads for the preservation of the region’s biodiversity and portrays the indigenous peoples as guardians of the forest. In 2018 he also visited Madre de Dios, a region of the Peruvian Amazon devastated by illegal mining and logging.

The pope appointed Steiner archbishop of Manaus right after the end of the Amazon synod, appealing to a Franciscan who clearly shares the same philosophy and ideology as the pope’s namesake, St. Francis. The Pope may have noticed Steiner because he held a prominent position in the Brazilian Episcopal Conference and served as its General Secretary from 2011 to 2019. He also has serious Roman credentials, having served as General Secretary from the Pontifical Antonianum University of the Franciscans in Rome, one of the main pontifical universities.

CATHOLIC BISHOPS OF THE AMAZON REGION MEET IN ROME

The Amazon Synod was also marked by the theft of three indigenous statues of a naked pregnant woman, which were part of a procession to the Vatican at the start of the meeting. Conservative critics had castigated the synod’s “pagan” prayers and idolatry, and early one morning thieves entered a church in the Vatican area where the statues were on display and threw them into the Tiber.

Francis publicly apologized to the Indigenous leaders present for the theft, and the statues were dredged from the river in time for the meeting to end. One was placed prominently in the synod hall while the synod fathers voted on the final recommendations.

The main thief, an Austrian far-right activist Alexander Tschugguel, became something of a celebrity within the traditionalist opposition to Francis because of the stunt. In the years that followed, the stunt itself came to crystallize the distaste that conservatives and traditionalists have for this pope, where even crimes are justified to save the faithful from his “heresy”.

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Gertrude Matilda Sylvester Obituary – Fond du Lac Reporter https://garibaldirosario.org/gertrude-matilda-sylvester-obituary-fond-du-lac-reporter/ Wed, 29 Jun 2022 03:42:27 +0000 https://garibaldirosario.org/gertrude-matilda-sylvester-obituary-fond-du-lac-reporter/ Gertrude Matilda (Padavich) Sylvester, 95, died quietly with loved ones by her side at Agrace Hospice in Fitchburg, WI on Monday June 27, 2022. Born September 12, 1926 in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania to John and Susan (Sehee) Padavich , Gertrude was the youngest of four after Toni, Mitzie and Joe. Gertie loved growing up with her […]]]>

Gertrude Matilda (Padavich) Sylvester, 95, died quietly with loved ones by her side at Agrace Hospice in Fitchburg, WI on Monday June 27, 2022. Born September 12, 1926 in Aliquippa, Pennsylvania to John and Susan (Sehee) Padavich , Gertrude was the youngest of four after Toni, Mitzie and Joe. Gertie loved growing up with her sisters and her lifelong best friend, Anka. Describing herself as “spoiled rotten,” Gertie fondly remembers being the favourite. She received her sacraments at St. Titus Catholic Church and graduated from Aliquippa High School in 1944. A natural jitterbug, Gertie and her sisters loved to go dancing, where on one occasion she met her soul mate, Paul William Sylvester. Unimpressed with the hype around an Italian returning from World War II, Gertie asked with her trademark cheek, “Who is this Paul Sylvester, anyway?” A voice behind her answered, and in five years of dating, Paul won his Duchess’s heart with poetry and song. They married on June 3, 1950 and welcomed their first, William John “Bill”, a year later. In 1954, they were blessed with twins, first Susan Lynn, then Paul William, Jr. Despite the double trouble, Mom kept a clean house and enjoyed raising her children, whom she considered her greatest. great success. All three have graduated from college and have enjoyed success in their careers. Susan and Paul Jr. became leaders in their fields of environmental protection and medical research, while Bill excelled in sales, taking over from his father. Paul Sr.’s sales career took the family all over the Midwest. They lived in four states, their favorite being West Bloomfield, MI, before settling in Fond du Lac, WI. For 40 years, the Sylvesters have been pillars of the Fond du Lac community. Gert volunteered at the St. Agnes Hospital Gift Shop for two decades and was active at St. Patrick’s (later Holy Family). Always dressed to perfection, Gert was a regular at the Diversions Salon and fashionable hats her signature accessory. She was also a dedicated supporter of Paul’s businesses, Sterling Custom Homes and Maturity Times. They enjoyed concerts at Buttermilk Creek Park near their home on Ellen Lane, as well as visits to dear neighbors, the Yeagers. Best known for its pastries, especially Christmas cookies like the family pizzelle, Gert’s lemon bar recipe has previously been featured in the FdL Reporter. Christmas also brought dinner and presents before Midnight Mass, but all visits to Granny and Grampy have featured Uno marathons, back scratches and hand washing dishes. A working grandparent, Granny was so proud of the accomplishments of her grandchildren: all with advanced degrees, three married, and the eldest bringing great-grandchildren. She was also a beloved step-grandparent. After Paul passed away, Gert moved to Stoughton, WI in 2014 to live with his daughter, son-in-law and their dogs. There she dazzled at Country Club Bridge and St. Ann’s. Recent highlights have been his surprise 90th and 95th birthdays. In 2019, she became a founding resident of Skaalen Heights and starred in their commercial. Gert will always be remembered for his sassy personality, timeless good looks and fierce love of family. A blessing to so many, his legacy lives on in all of us. Gertrude was predeceased by her husband; son, Bill and his wife, Mary; Parents; siblings: Antionette “Toni” (Fred) Ringer, Mary “Mitzie” (Pete) Snyder, Joseph (Eva) Padavich; nephews: Freddie Jr. and Bob.; and her best friend, Ann (Marovich) Rossi. She lives through her children: Susan (Lee Nobiensky) and Dr. Paul (Dr. Karen Briski) Sylvester; grandchildren: Bill (Lisa Martin) and Angela (Chris Smith) Sylvester, Michelle “Mikki” Heckman, and Kaitlin (Timmy Mohr) and Margrethe “Maggie” Sylvester; step-grandsons: Sam (Kilee) and Max Nobiensky; three great-grandchildren and one step-great-grandchild; beloved nieces, Mary Jo and Carolyn; and many more special friends and extended family. We would like to thank Dr. Nilam Raval, Skaalen Heights and Agrace Hospice for their incredible care, and Father Randy and Rita Walker for their spiritual support. Special thanks to Dale Nobiensky, Marla Frey and all of Susan’s Ya-Yas, who became Gert’s Maids of Honor. Services will be held at St. Ann’s Catholic Church on Friday, July 1, 2022: 9:30 a.m., visitation at 10:30 a.m., mass at 11 a.m. Please send flowers and memorials to St. Ann’s Catholic Church, Stoughton, WI. Please share your memories of Gert by posting on his Tribute Wall. Cress Funeral Service 206 W. Prospect Street, PO Box 231, Stoughton (608) 873-9244

Posted on June 28, 2022

Posted in Fond du Lac Reporter

service information

Visitation

St. Anne’s Catholic Church.

July 01, 2022 at 10:30 a.m. – 11:00 a.m.

Service

St. Anne’s Catholic Church.

July 01, 2022 at 9:30 AM

Memorial Mass

St. Anne’s Catholic Church.

July 01, 2022 at 11:00

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Reston church hit by graffiti and fire after Roe V. Wade decision: cops https://garibaldirosario.org/reston-church-hit-by-graffiti-and-fire-after-roe-v-wade-decision-cops/ Mon, 27 Jun 2022 12:31:38 +0000 https://garibaldirosario.org/reston-church-hit-by-graffiti-and-fire-after-roe-v-wade-decision-cops/ RESTON, VA – A Catholic church in Reston was vandalized with spray paint following the recent Roe v. Wade from the Supreme Court, the Fairfax County Police Department upheld. Someone also started a fire on the church grounds, officers said. Police say the Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department responded to St. John Neumann Catholic […]]]>

RESTON, VA – A Catholic church in Reston was vandalized with spray paint following the recent Roe v. Wade from the Supreme Court, the Fairfax County Police Department upheld. Someone also started a fire on the church grounds, officers said.

Police say the Fairfax County Fire and Rescue Department responded to St. John Neumann Catholic Community Church on Lawyers Road after receiving a call for smoldering mulch around 7 a.m. Sunday.

Police said firefighters determined an accelerant was likely used in the blaze. While there, they noticed spray-painted graffiti on a sign at the entrance to the church.

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Officers said firefighters also found three additional locations at the back of the church damaged by graffiti.

“The spray-painted remarks were related to the recent Supreme Court Roe v. Wade decision. Officers are working with church staff to review surveillance footage,” police said in a news release.

Find out what’s happening in Restonwith free real-time Patch updates.

Additionally, police said they have increased patrols at the church and other places of worship.

Anyone who may have information about this incident is asked to contact detectives at 703-478-0904. Tips can also be submitted anonymously through Crime Solvers by phone – 1-866-411-TIPS (866-411-8477), by text – type “FCCS” plus the tip to 847411, and by web – Click here.

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Lay American Catholics to ‘redouble efforts to help moms’ after Roe overthrow https://garibaldirosario.org/lay-american-catholics-to-redouble-efforts-to-help-moms-after-roe-overthrow/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 19:46:56 +0000 https://garibaldirosario.org/lay-american-catholics-to-redouble-efforts-to-help-moms-after-roe-overthrow/ After the United States Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday, Catholic leaders and lay people are gearing up to step up efforts to promote a culture of life, according to Peggy Hartshorn. By Devin Watkins “Catholic charities and Catholic health services will compete with the abortion industry with good care on the web, […]]]>

After the United States Supreme Court overturned Roe v. Wade on Friday, Catholic leaders and lay people are gearing up to step up efforts to promote a culture of life, according to Peggy Hartshorn.

By Devin Watkins

“Catholic charities and Catholic health services will compete with the abortion industry with good care on the web, and we will redouble our efforts as lay people working with the Church to provide more avenues of care. pregnancy aid.”

Peggy Hartshorn, Chair of the Board of Directors of Heartbeat International, offered this assessment on the way forward for the pro-life movement in the United States, following the Supreme Court’s decision in Dobbs vs. Jackson.

The Court decided 5-4 Friday to annul the 1973 Roe vs. Wade decision, declaring that abortion is not a constitutional right and giving states the power to legislate on the issue.

Love and support for mothers-to-be

In response, the U.S. bishops welcomed the court’s decision and said the Church should “serve those facing difficult pregnancies and surround them with love.”

Heartbeat International, chaired by Dr. Hartshorn, and other church-run programs are already turning that commitment into concrete care, in the form of crisis pregnancy centers. The Interdenominational Christian Association supports a network of more than 3,000 centers in 65 countries, with approximately 1,700 centers in the United States.

Speaking to Vatican News, Dr. Hartshorn highlighted the witness offered by her organization, which she says is “love, care and support for expectant mothers, their babies and struggling families.”

This caring approach, she added, can help people resolve their internal conflicts over abortion, in addition to helping pregnant women carry their babies to term.

“Once they understand that abortion is not their only option, they are often so relieved that they do not feel compelled to choose an abortion.”

Listen to the full interview

Overcoming coercion to abort

Dr Hartshorn says studies have shown that “the vast number of women feel some kind of coercion or pressure to make an abortion decision”.

“They may say they think the abortion is what they need,” she said, “but when you get to the bottom of the feelings, women will say they don’t want to have an abortion. .”

The pregnancy-help movement can offer assistance to women in these situations, according to Dr. Hartshorn.

A crisis pregnancy center helps women connect to “a faith-based network,” which includes Catholic health care and social services.

“The body of Christ has stood up to really provide the help and support that women really, really want. And they are choosing life in increasing numbers.

Public opinion and laws

Laws have a significant influence on people’s opinions on issues, says Dr. Hartshorn.

She has been involved in the pro-life movement since 1973, and has seen how “as soon as the Supreme Court decision [in Roe v. Wade] fell and abortion was declared legal in all 50 states, public attitudes changed dramatically”.

Before the roe deer in office, a majority of Americans believed that “abortion was a bad thing”. But subsequently, public opinion swung in favor of access to abortion.

Walk with moms in need

Catholic dioceses across the United States also offer another service to women and families with an initiative called “Walking with Moms in Need.”

Julie Dumalet, JD, director of pro-life activities for the Archdiocese of Galveston-Houston in Texas, said the initiative offers lay Catholics the opportunity to “walk in the shoes” of local pregnant women and mothers who have need financial assistance.

She told Vatican News that “Walking with Moms in Need” aims to help parents of older children, including toddlers, school-aged children and teenagers.

“What we are fortunate to be able to do,” Dr. Dumalet said, “is build on what we have done with our pregnancy aid to create a culture of lifelong and to embrace parents at all levels of need.”

Listen to the full interview

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Six sexual abuse complaints filed against a now deceased Catholic priest https://garibaldirosario.org/six-sexual-abuse-complaints-filed-against-a-now-deceased-catholic-priest/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 03:47:00 +0000 https://garibaldirosario.org/six-sexual-abuse-complaints-filed-against-a-now-deceased-catholic-priest/ A priest who sexually and physically assaulted a teenager showed up at his victim’s home for tea with his mother. The victim, now in his 60s, was one of six people to file a sexual abuse complaint against Father George William Harrison, who coached schoolboys in rugby and served in many parishes in Christchurch and […]]]>

A priest who sexually and physically assaulted a teenager showed up at his victim’s home for tea with his mother.

The victim, now in his 60s, was one of six people to file a sexual abuse complaint against Father George William Harrison, who coached schoolboys in rugby and served in many parishes in Christchurch and the West Coast from 1935 until on his retirement in 1981.

The man recently told the Royal Commission into Abuse in Care about the physical, sexual, spiritual and psychological abuse he suffered at the hands of Harrison between 1969 and 1971.

The offense caused lifelong and sometimes debilitating post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).

READ MORE:
* Accused priest still in parish service
* The Catholic Church was aware of an earlier complaint against a priest grooming teenagers
* The Catholic Church planned to house a sexologist priest on the grounds of the primary school

Te Rōpū Tautoko, the group that coordinates the Catholic Church’s engagement with the royal commission, found that 1,122 people reported 1,680 abuses against 592 Catholic clergy, brothers, nuns, sisters and lay people between 1950 and 2021.

Survivors say the figures represent a “drop in the ocean” due to under-reporting and the church’s failure to keep records.

Christchurch Bishop Michael Gielen said the diocese had registered six complaints about Harrison, who died in 1987. The first complaint was filed in 1993 and the others in 2002.

Harrison was born in 1911 and ordained a priest in Rome in 1935. Most of his parishes were in the suburbs of Christchurch, but he was in Hokitika intermittently before working in Greymouth from 1968 to 1975. He then worked in Ross until on his retirement.

His Grace Archbishop McKeefry, left, with Harrison, center, in 1954.

Press archive

His Grace Archbishop McKeefry, left, with Harrison, center, in 1954.

Diary records show that Harrison was a spinster at St Bede’s College and earned a doctorate in theology. A 1959 report says he was a “well-known” rugby administrator who coached junior teams and refereed high school games under the name Mr WJ Brown. He was a Canterbury Rugby Union delegate and Marist club chaplain for 12 years.

The man, who did not want to be named, said in his statement to the royal commission that Harrison immediately befriended his family when they moved to Greymouth in 1969.

Harrison would appear outside of school to drive him home, then take him to secluded places and try to kiss and touch him.

He would force the boy to perform a sexual act or beat him if he refused.

If the teenager managed to run away and walk home, he would find Harrison at home drinking tea with his mother.

Harrison told him he was a sinner and was no longer welcome at church, which caused him tremendous distress and anxiety.

He contemplated suicide and felt estranged from his family.

Over the years he bottled up the memories and turned to alcohol, but in 2000 he was triggered after stories of abuse by Catholic priests emerged in the media.

Harrison, standing right, in 1959.

Press archive

Harrison, standing right, in 1959.

“I ended up having a nervous breakdown and spent eight to 10 weeks in the mental health unit…I was diagnosed with chronic PTSD, depression, anxiety, panic attacks .”

He took advice and filed a complaint against Harrison with the Bishop of Christchurch John Cunneen. The bishop apologized and told him that he was the only person who had filed a complaint against Harrison.

The first complaint about Harrison had actually been received seven years earlier.

The man thought the bishop’s apology was insincere and said he felt blamed by the victim when a letter he received from another clergyman referred to ” the opening of old wounds”.

Bishop John Cunneen, who died in 2010, has apologized to one of six survivors of abuse by a priest in Greymouth.

Provided

Bishop John Cunneen, who died in 2010, has apologized to one of six survivors of abuse by a priest in Greymouth.

The man wanted an independent and impartial agency set up to receive complaints of abuse. He also wanted clergy to be scrutinized, victims offered indefinite treatment paid for by the church, and a formal written apology for the abuse they suffered.

Gielen said records showed Cunneen wrote a letter of apology to a complainant about Harrison, but there was no record of an investigation. Cunneen died in 2010.

The church’s professional standards complaints committee did not keep full meeting minutes at the time, so it was difficult to track its investigations, Gielen said.

Cardinal John Dew, Archbishop of Wellington and Metropolitan Archbishop of New Zealand, issued a formal apology to all victims of church abuse during a public session of the royal commission in March 2021.

RNZ

The Catholic Church says it is shamed and saddened by abuse in the church. The church opened up its evidence at the abuse in care inquiry into how it handled the complaints. (Video first published in March 2021)

Gielen said the church supports the creation of an independent redress agency and is determined to ensure the abuse never happens again.

It now carefully selects trainee priests and has independent professional investigators to follow up on complaints, he said.

Victims’ attorney Murray Heasley said the records were destroyed and the survivors lied to bishops anxious to protect the institution and its assets.

It was estimated that only 1% of complainants had come forward. It often took someone up to 50 years to report the abuse they had suffered – a symptom of the debilitating effect it had had, Heasley said.

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Catholic Church calls on Marape government to explain COVID-19 funds https://garibaldirosario.org/catholic-church-calls-on-marape-government-to-explain-covid-19-funds/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 10:39:00 +0000 https://garibaldirosario.org/catholic-church-calls-on-marape-government-to-explain-covid-19-funds/ The national government of Papua New Guinea, through the Ministry of Health, has been called upon to explain how COVID-19-related expenses for the use of sports facilities in the nation’s capital have gone unpaid since 2020, despite millions of kinas allocated for the containment exercise. A K6. 2 million is owed to the PNG Sports […]]]>

The national government of Papua New Guinea, through the Ministry of Health, has been called upon to explain how COVID-19-related expenses for the use of sports facilities in the nation’s capital have gone unpaid since 2020, despite millions of kinas allocated for the containment exercise.

A K6. 2 million is owed to the PNG Sports Foundation for the use of its Rita Flynn facility for isolation purposes and other related costs for its other facilities – at the height of the pandemic.

Paul. Picture H; PNG Newsletter

This has resulted in the closure of these facilities and the lockdown of other vital medical equipment by the Foundation and the announcement of a halt to COVID-19 operations in the city by the NCD Provincial Health Authority – which has no financial power. to pay the outstanding amount.

Assistant Comptroller Dr. Daoni Esorom disclosed that between K12-13 million has accumulated in the Health Improvement Program Fund Trust Account for COVID-19 related ASP expenses and other health and administrative activities since 2020:

Catholic Professionals Society President Paul Harricknen made the appeal today (Wednesday, June 22, 2022), saying the Society had applied to challenge the constitutionality of the Pandemic Act 2020 alongside the head of the opposition Belden Namah, as it excluded the application of public financial management laws on COVID funds among others.

”Funds in the millions that have been provided for the purposes of COVID-19. These funds have been kept in the trust account and the government under the pandemic act 2020 has excluded the application of the public management act they are monitoring the scrutiny by the public accounts they are monitoring review by the auditor, they have therefore been retained in the trust accounts. and we believe that these sums have not been accounted for and verification has not been done,” Harricknen said.

NBC/PNG Today

Next: PNG Kumuls Captain David Mead Retires

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Gillgannon, American priest who spent three decades in Bolivia as Vatican II advocate, dies https://garibaldirosario.org/gillgannon-american-priest-who-spent-three-decades-in-bolivia-as-vatican-ii-advocate-dies/ Mon, 20 Jun 2022 15:44:04 +0000 https://garibaldirosario.org/gillgannon-american-priest-who-spent-three-decades-in-bolivia-as-vatican-ii-advocate-dies/ Prof. Michael Gillgannon, Missionary Priest for the Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph, Missouri, and leading scholar of Latin America, died June 19. He was 88 years old. For more than 30 years, Gillgannon wrote for NCR from Bolivia in columns criticizing American foreign policy and supporting church reform efforts in the region. He uniquely combined […]]]>

Prof. Michael Gillgannon, Missionary Priest for the Diocese of Kansas City-St. Joseph, Missouri, and leading scholar of Latin America, died June 19. He was 88 years old.

For more than 30 years, Gillgannon wrote for NCR from Bolivia in columns criticizing American foreign policy and supporting church reform efforts in the region. He uniquely combined his pastoral experience, an understanding of history and international affairs.

“He lived for his ministry,” the father said. Pat Rush, priest and former Vicar General of Kansas City-St. Diocese of Joseph. “He was totally absorbed in the social gospel as he saw it.” Rush described Gillgannon as “a very gentle man”.

“I can’t imagine him dealing with dictators in Latin America. He always wanted to be at peace with people,” Rush told NCR.

Pr. Chuck Tobin, another priest from Kansas City-St. Joseph Diocese, described Gillgannon as having “a prophetic view of gospel values ​​that were often ignored either by individual church communities or by nation states”.

“Mike, indeed, lived through Luke 4,” Tobin said. “He brought good news to the poor and the blind sight and thereby, I mean opening the eyes of the nation on injustices and the needs of oppressed.”

Dominican Sr. Barbara Reid, president of the Catholic Theological Union of Chicago, told the story of meeting Gillgannon in the early 2000s, when the priest came to hear her lecture on a feminist interpretation of Scripture. . She remembers him asking her if she knew anyone who could give a similar presentation in Spanish. Reid had taught Spanish for six years. So she agreed and ended up traveling to La Paz to speak on several occasions.

“I learned so much from him,” Reid told NCR, adding, “He helped shape my research.”

Gillgannon was born in Kansas City, the youngest of nine children, four of whom became priests or members of religious orders. He was ordained in 1958. Like many other priests of his generation, he was strongly influenced by the Second Vatican Council, which took place in the mid-1960s and triggered major changes in the world and in particular in Latin American churches, as many have opted for what they have called “the preferential option for the poor”.

The renewal of the American church was also in the air in the late 1960s. In 1966, Gillgannon sat on the advisory committee of the American episcopal conference for the post-Vatican II reorganization of the Catholic University Ministry in the country. He became the National Secretary for Catholic Campus Ministry, helping to redesign and rewrite campus ministry programs.

In 1974, he moved to La Paz, Bolivia, to become a missionary. He has served as a pastor, episcopal vicar and national chaplain for the Bolivian campus ministry. He wrote once that he thought he would simply end a five-year stint in missionary work, but he did not realize how “fascinated and involved” he would become “with struggles that changed daily life and the Catholic Church “. He remained there nearly 40 years, returning to Kansas City in 2012 to minister to the Spanish-speaking community and continue his lectures on Catholic social ethics and economic development.

For his work in Bolivia, Gillgannon received two honorary doctorates. In 2000, he received the title of Doctor of Sacred Theology from the South Florida Center For Theological Studies in Miami. In 2004, he received the Doctor of Ministry degree from the College of the Holy Cross in Worcester, Massachusetts.

Gillgannon was a scholar. He devoured and analyzed books. He posts when he can. On return trips to the United States between 1974 and 2012, he consulted with members of the Latin American office of the American bishops.

His goal, he explained, was to provide ethical and religious information from his experiences. Although the years and circumstances have changed, his message has remained largely coherent: American economic and social policies exploit the poor in Latin America.

He was quick to criticize the American Catholic hierarchy, which he believed rarely preached the social teachings of the Catholic Church. He abstract his advice to American church leaders in a 2018 blog he posted on his website:

Bishops and priests, Get out of your ghetto. Learn why you live well in a wealthy and comfortable nation that you take for granted, as do your followers. Study, preach and teach Gaudium and Spes, Pacem in terris, Populorum progressio, [and the documents of] Medellin and Puebla. And please do not say that the economy and the policy of American international relations are too complicated for an ethical discussion or a popular preaching. Your ignorance will only confirm those who say your moral authority is undermined by your selectivity.

Live the poverty, personal and ecclesiastical, which you must now preach to a debauched nation. There is no vocation problem in the United States. There is simply no reason to choose the priesthood or the religious life where comfort and conformity are the norm. Where is the challenge? Where is the idealism? Where is the sacrifice?

In 2018, Gillgannon published a reflection on his life as a missionary, titled Father Miguel. He said he had written the book to inspire interest in Latin America and encourage people to ask critical ethical questions and to reflect on social justice.

Throughout his life and ministry, Gillgannon maintained hope that information was vital and that Catholic social teachings had the ingredients needed to form good consciences. He felt compelled to provide the necessary information, based on his missionary experiences, in the belief that American Catholics could influence and change the direction of American foreign policy. It was a big request.

A few weeks before he died, I visited him in a hospital room in Kansas City. His health was declining. He was both lighthearted and serious, in many ways the same Gillgannon. He spoke and I mostly listened. He denounced US foreign policy as it continues to affect the poor in Latin America. These poor people were never abstractions for Gillgannon. I said to myself that he would carry the weight of his worries until his last breaths, his mission never completely accomplished, so great is the weight of his missionary encounters and the desire to remain faithful to the Gospel.

No doubt his many friends are praying that his worries and anguish will be rewarded, and that he will live in eternal peace.

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Meet the 10 new Blesseds of the Catholic Church https://garibaldirosario.org/meet-the-10-new-blesseds-of-the-catholic-church/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 14:00:00 +0000 https://garibaldirosario.org/meet-the-10-new-blesseds-of-the-catholic-church/ When one of the soldiers tried to force the sister out of the room, she successfully resisted, clinging to the cross and calling on Mary for help: “Holy Mother of God, allow me to die virgin, protect my purity! On March 1, 1945, while the sisters were praying and Sister Maria Sabina repeated her request […]]]>

When one of the soldiers tried to force the sister out of the room, she successfully resisted, clinging to the cross and calling on Mary for help: “Holy Mother of God, allow me to die virgin, protect my purity!

On March 1, 1945, while the sisters were praying and Sister Maria Sabina repeated her request to Mary, a bullet pierced the door and struck her in the chest, killing her. She was buried in the Catholic cemetery in Lubań.

Blessed Sister Maria Melusja (Marta) Rybka. Courtesy of the Elizabethan Sisters.

Blessed Sister Maria Melusja (Marta) Rybka was born on July 11, 1905 in Pawłow, near Racibórz. She entered the Congregation of the Sisters of Saint Elizabeth in 1927 and made her perpetual vows on July 31, 1934. She spent her life as a nun at the Maison Saint-Georges in Nysa, working in the garden and the bakery, and doing household. . During World War II, she cared for the elderly and sick and cared for girls in housekeeping school.

On March 24, 1945, Sister Maria Melusja was attacked and shot by a Red Army soldier while defending a girl who was being assaulted. According to witnesses, the sister saved the house from the fire, because the fire started by the soldiers stopped in front of the room where the body of the sister lay in a pool of blood.

The sister’s body is buried in a mass grave in the Sisters’ Garden at 16 Słowiańska Street in Nysa.

Blessed Sister Maria Sapientia (Łucja) Heymann.  Courtesy of the Elizabethan Sisters.
Blessed Sister Maria Sapientia (Łucja) Heymann. Courtesy of the Elizabethan Sisters.

Blessed Sister Maria Sapientia (Łucja) Heymann was born on April 19, 1875 in Lubiesz, near Wałcz, in northwestern Poland. She entered the Congregation of the Sisters of Saint Elizabeth in 1894 and made her perpetual profession on July 2, 1906. She worked as a nurse in Hamburg and then in Nysa.

When the Red Army entered Nysa, the atmosphere of fear and uncertainty increased. On March 24, 1945, soldiers ordered the sisters of St. Elizabeth’s house to assemble in the refectory. One of the soldiers approached a young sister and wanted to take her away. Blessed Maria Sapientia implored him to give up saying, “No, I beg you, no”. The soldier put his gun to his head and fired.

Her mortal remains were buried in a common grave in the monastery garden of St. Elizabeth’s House in Nysa.

Blessed Sister Maria Acutina (Helena) Goldberg.  Courtesy of the Elizabethan Sisters.
Blessed Sister Maria Acutina (Helena) Goldberg. Courtesy of the Elizabethan Sisters.

Blessed Sister Maria Acutina (Helena) Goldberg was born on July 6, 1882 in Dłużek, then in East Prussia. At 23, she joined the Sisters of Saint Elizabeth and made her perpetual vows on July 25, 1917.

For many years she worked as a nurse in a spa sanatorium in Wleń and in a home for retired priests in Nysa. From 1941 she worked in an orphanage in Lubiąż as a guardian of war orphans.

Aware of the brutality of the Red Army soldiers who entered the city on January 26, 1945, Sister Maria Acutina continually watches over the safety of the girls entrusted to her care. On May 2, 1945, she was shot while defending them.

The body of Sister Maria Acutina was buried in the parish cemetery of Krzydlina Mała, in southwestern Poland.

Blessed Sister Maria Adela (Klara) Schramm.  Courtesy of the Elizabethan Sisters.
Blessed Sister Maria Adela (Klara) Schramm. Courtesy of the Elizabethan Sisters.

Blessed Sister Maria Adela (Klara) Schramm was born on June 3, 1885 in Łączna near Kłodzko in southwestern Poland.

In 1912, she joined the Sisters of Saint Elizabeth and made her perpetual vows on June 29, 1924. She worked in Ramułtowice, Szklarska Poręba, Wałbrzych-Sobięcin and Godzieszów, where she was superior of the local communities.

As the Red Army approached, Sister Maria Adela decided to stay and care for the elderly women in her care. After Red Army soldiers took the village, she and her proteges found shelter at the farm of Maria and Paul Baum.

On February 25, 1945, a soldier broke into the house. Blessed Maria Adela, defending her accusations and her vowed chastity to God, was shot, along with her hosts and others staying there. All were buried in Godzieszów, in southwestern Poland, on the farmer’s property in a bomb crater, where later a plaque was erected to commemorate their deaths.

Blessed Sister Maria Adelheidis (Jadwiga) Töpfer.  Courtesy of the Elizabethan Sisters.
Blessed Sister Maria Adelheidis (Jadwiga) Töpfer. Courtesy of the Elizabethan Sisters.

Another victim of brutality by Soviet troops was Blessed Sister Maria Adelheidis (Jadwiga) Töpfershot down on March 24, 1945.

She was born in Nysa on August 26, 1887. She entered the Congregation of the Sisters of Saint Elizabeth in 1907 and made her perpetual profession on July 28, 1919.

She had great pedagogical skills and for many years she was a teacher and director of a housekeeping and handicraft school in Koźle, and from 1942 at St. George’s boarding school in Nysa.

In 1943 she was moved to St. Notburga House in Nysa. During the Soviet occupation of the city, the sick and the elderly took refuge with the sisters. Sister Maria Adelheidis stayed with them. Despite extremely difficult living conditions, she always found a place and offered help to those who needed it. She was the soul of the house.

As the soldiers wandered through the building, a Red Army man entered the room where the sister and her charges were staying. Provocatively, he showed his bleeding hand and asked who had fired from the room. Although everyone honestly denied it, he shot Sister Maria Adelheidis. His body was buried in the Jerusalem Cemetery at Nysa.

Blessed Sister Maria Felicitas (Anna Ellmerer).  Courtesy of the Elizabethan Sisters.
Blessed Sister Maria Felicitas (Anna Ellmerer). Courtesy of the Elizabethan Sisters.

Blessed Sister Maria Felicitas (Anna Ellmerer) was shot down at Nysa on March 25, 1945.

She was born on May 12, 1888 in Grafing, near Munich. She entered the Congregation of the Sisters of Saint Elizabeth, making her perpetual profession on July 5, 1923, working as a teacher and tutor in Düsseldorf, Kup and Nysa.

Soviet soldiers stationed in St. Elizabeth’s House constantly disturbed the sisters, who experienced days of fear and terror. The superior of the house begged them to leave the sisters alone. In response, she was struck with the butt of a rifle and knocked unconscious. Sister Maria Felicitas rushed to her aid. A soldier took advantage of this and tried to drag her out. As the sister defended herself and resisted, he fired a warning shot.

In response, Sister Maria Felicitas stood against the wall, stretched out her hands in the shape of a cross and shouted aloud, “Long live Christ the K…!” The last word was interrupted by a deadly bullet. The killer stomped on his victim’s head and chest with his heavy boots.

The sister’s mortal remains are buried in the monastery garden at 16 Słowiańska Street in Nysa.

A prayer for the necessary graces through the intercession of Blessed Mr. Paschalis and the Nine Companions:

Lord Jesus Christ crucified and risen,
You have strengthened Blessed Maria Paschalis and her Companions
sacrifice their lives.
By defending the dignity and chastity of a woman
as well as performing acts of mercy,
they remained faithful to you
to the shedding of blood.
May the example of their lives encourage us
to generous service to our brethren
and to the zealous fulfillment of your commandments.

Through their intercession, grant us the favors
that we ask you with confidence,
you who live and reign forever and ever.
Amen.

Our Father…Hail Mary…Glory be to the Father…

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Catholic Church Removes Pride Worcester School Affiliation, BLM Flags – NBC Boston https://garibaldirosario.org/catholic-church-removes-pride-worcester-school-affiliation-blm-flags-nbc-boston/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 23:47:12 +0000 https://garibaldirosario.org/catholic-church-removes-pride-worcester-school-affiliation-blm-flags-nbc-boston/ The Diocese of Worcester stripped a school in the city of Massachusetts of its affiliation with the Catholic Church because of the flags it displayed in support of Black Lives Matter and LGBTQ rights. A decree issued Thursday by Bishop Robert McManus now prohibits Worcester Nativity School from identifying itself as a Catholic school. Bishop […]]]>

The Diocese of Worcester stripped a school in the city of Massachusetts of its affiliation with the Catholic Church because of the flags it displayed in support of Black Lives Matter and LGBTQ rights.

A decree issued Thursday by Bishop Robert McManus now prohibits Worcester Nativity School from identifying itself as a Catholic school.

Bishop Robert McManus says the Black Lives Matter and Pride flags contradict Catholic social and moral teaching.

“The waving of these flags in front of a Catholic school sends a mixed, confusing and outrageous message to the public,” McManus wrote.

Diocesan spokesman Raymond Delisle doubled down on McManus’ position.

“Bishop was just looking for alternatives to flags so they could get the same points across, that Black Lives matters, that God loves everyone, but does it have to be done with specific logos, if you will, of a particular organization with whom we have differences? he said.

The school says the flags will not be removed.

“As a multicultural school, the flags represent inclusion and respect for all,” said President Thomas McKenney of Nativity School in Worcester. in a report. “These flags simply indicate that all are welcome at the Nativity and this value of inclusion is rooted in Catholic teaching.”

“We are hearing more and more Catholic communities embracing inclusivity, and I think hearing a bishop trying to promote the opposite is just plain nonsense,” said Nativity elder Guillermo Creamer Jr. “It is very difficult to be an openly gay alumnus and to hear that the bishop is wresting Catholic status from an institution that has truly done nothing but good in our community.”

School officials say they will appeal to the Vatican.

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Experts debate the meaning of ‘synodalism’ for the global church https://garibaldirosario.org/experts-debate-the-meaning-of-synodalism-for-the-global-church/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 07:55:23 +0000 https://garibaldirosario.org/experts-debate-the-meaning-of-synodalism-for-the-global-church/ ROME – Throughout the month of July, some 100,000 people will be able to participate in a free online seminar on synodality, organized by three theologians from Latin America, but including witnesses from around the world. “Common Discernment and Decision-Making in the Church” is the theme of the first in a series of courses to […]]]>

ROME – Throughout the month of July, some 100,000 people will be able to participate in a free online seminar on synodality, organized by three theologians from Latin America, but including witnesses from around the world.

“Common Discernment and Decision-Making in the Church” is the theme of the first in a series of courses to be organized by the School of Theology and Ministry at Boston College, sponsored by the Episcopal Conferences of Latin America, d Europe and Asia, as well as Jesuits in Latin America and organizations of superior generals of male and female religious congregations.


Six members of a long list of speakers answered questions related to the chosen topic and sent them to Crux, for a sample of what those who will participate in the course will learn. The initiative aims to help Catholics understand the concept of synodality, ahead of the Synod of Bishops on Synodality, which was opened by Pope Francis last October and will end in October 2023, when prelates from around the world will meet in Rome.

RELATED: Synod on Synodality Will Be a ‘Process of Spiritual Discernment’, Attendees Say

Here are the questions each received, tailored to their presentations, and what they had to say. The list includes lay theologians – men and women – nuns and priests. They come from Africa, Asia, Europe and Latin America.

Speaker: Judith Gruber, German theologian from Ku Leuven University in Belgium.

Course: Managing Conflicts and Differences

Node: What role does conflict play in a synodal church?

Synodality also makes room for fresh and productive thinking about conflict and disagreement in the Church – in a way that does not understand conflict as an “extraordinary” occurrence in a Church that is “normally” in unity. . Instead, within a synodal church, conflict can be approached as a challenging but fruitful way to arrive at a deeper vision of the church’s identity and mission in the world. Synodality is a dialogical process of patient and mutual listening between and through all levels of the Church which aims to enable the Church “to listen to God, so that with him we may hear the cry of his people ; listen to his people until we are in harmony with the will to which God calls us.

Such listening does not provide unambiguous information about God’s will, but is a shared effort to discern God’s will for God’s creation, here and today.

As Pope Francis has pointed out, such a process of discernment is not free from controversy and so he has encouraged theologians to explore contentious issues as part of the journey to discerning what the Spirit is saying to God. Church in this place. Synodal ecclesiology, in other words, makes room for disagreement and conflict in the theological conception of the Church.

In this context, we can understand that the conflict has a quality of revelation – to enable us to discern something authentically new about the Church, the world and God, as Pope Francis beautifully expressed in Querida Amazonincluding when he said that conflict resolution is not simply about finding out who is right and who is wrong, but that the way forward should rather be to “transcend the two approaches and find other better ways, maybe not even imagined yet. The conflict is overcome on a higher level, where each group can join the other in a new reality.

Speaker: Sister Josée Ngalula, from the Democratic Republic of Congo

Conference: Women’s Leadership and Governance in the Church

Node: What are the difficulties encountered by women in the African Church, which must be changed?

Three essential difficulties facing African women in Africa must be changed urgently: financial insecurity, the cultural trivialization of violence when it is a woman who is the victim, sexual abuse at work, in the ecclesial milieu as well as in situations of insecurity and war.

Can you share some key concepts from African theology that can help to understand and better receive synodality?

I can think of several, but allow me to share three: Ecclesiology of “the Church as Family of God and Brotherhood (Church Family of God-Brotherhood)”, the African palaver as a space where the priority is to let absolutely everyone express themselves; the “ubuntu” vision, where living on earth means walking together.

Speaker: German Gregor-Maria Hoff, professor of fundamental theology and ecumenical theology at the University of Paris Lodron in Salzburg

Lecture: Power in the Church

Node: How do we define power in the Church and what do you think needs to change?

The Church is the space in which the unlimited creative life force of God must be exercised. It is the beginning of and in everything. Jesus Christ embodies it: in his life, in his message of the kingdom of God – and he continues to function as a power of faith and life in the church if and as long as he gives signs of life. It is on this that the power of the Church depends, on this it is measured.

Everything that is mortal must be transformed into new life options. Transformation, therefore, not only in the Eucharist, strikes at the heart of what the Church is. Concretely, this means that where the Church does not function as a space in which God’s creative life power can be experienced, it must change. This particularly concerns the possibility for all the baptized to participate responsibly in such processes of transformation.

How can the German synodal way contribute to the synod on synodality?

The German synodal path begins with an experience determined by the power of the Church: the sexual and spiritual abuse of people. It has systemic reasons that are deeply tied to how power is vested in the Catholic Church: holy potestasas sacred power.

Power must be controlled in its use – this also applies to the church. Transparency at all levels of ecclesiastical decision-making is therefore more than a simple technique or a change of functions. It is about the deep spiritual experience that the charisms of all the baptized need space in the church in order to eliminate false concentrations of power. We need a global distribution of powers: spiritual, institutional, but also epistemic. The Synodal Path practices such a division of powers – as an experience it can have an impact on the Church. It is already obvious: the subjects and problems which are negotiated on the Synodal Way do not only concern the Church in Germany. The future of the Catholic Church depends on her seeing herself as truly synodal.

Speaker: Christina Kheng from Singapore, theologian, teaches pastoral leadership at the East Asian Pastoral Institute in Manila

Conference: Models of discernment in Asia

Node: What are the key elements that should be present in a community discernment process?

An important element is our inner freedom to seek God’s will together. Although each person must certainly express their true desires and concerns in a dialogue, it is necessary to move from “me” to “we” so that we let go of our own attachments and sincerely ask, “What is the Holy Spirit ? reveal to the whole community? What is best for the common good? Only then do we truly discern as a community.

What are the challenges and opportunities for building a synodal church in Asia?

Basic issues related to livelihoods, education, health and security remain a major concern, even a daily struggle for many people in Asia. They do not normally think of synodality or co-responsibility for the mission of the Church. However, this challenge can also be an opportunity.

Many local leaders have found ways to bring people together to meet these basic needs, with everyone playing a role and reaching out to the most vulnerable. This was particularly evident during the Covid pandemic. The Church must build on this momentum in partnership with others.

Speaker: Spaniard Carlos García de Andoin, theologian from the University of Deusto, Spain

Conference: Synodality, Democracy and Parliamentarism

Node: Why is a synodal institutional model for the Church not comparable to democracy or parliamentarism?

Decision-making in the Church does not respond to political programs but to listening to the will of God here and now. It is not self-referential. The norma [norm of norms] is the Gospel of Jesus Christ, already given, and not a Constitution to be agreed upon. Democratic deliberation is for us synodal discernment: what the Spirit says to the Churches. A synodal institutional model is not based on antagonistic but community logics.

What can we learn from contemporary systems of political organization that help in church reform?

The instrumentation and regulation of participation for the adoption of decisions and the election of leaders. The universal nature of participation. Submission to the law of the exercise of authority, to avoid arbitrariness. The regulation of counterweights in the exercise of power, avoiding the risks of hyper-leadership or authoritarianism. The need for the vertical principle and the horizontal principle in the exercise of power and its articulation, which in the case of the Church requires a rebalancing of the apostolic or hierarchical principle with the synodal principle.

Speaker: Carlos Schickendantz, Argentinian theologian from the Chilean University Alberto Hurtado

Conference: Accountability: international relations and ecclesial responses

Node: Why speak of a reform in the Church?

In the document on ecumenism, the Second Vatican Council recalls an expression of Paul VI formulated in 1964: “as an earthly and human institution”, the Church is called by Christ to “eternal reform”.

Therefore, the renewal of people and the reform of the institution must be thought of as permanent tasks. Each generation of believers has the responsibility to carry out this “perennial reform” by letting themselves be guided by the Gospel and its tradition on the one hand, and by the signs of the times on the other.

How can synodality contribute to ecclesial reform and what dimensions does it include?

The synodal process represents a kairos for a renewal of the whole life of the Church. It includes a personal conversion of each believer and, at the same time, a reform of the structures, of the various ways of proceeding in the various diocesan, national and universal authorities. In the task of renewal, one or the other aspect should not be chosen, personal spiritual conversion or institutional reform. Nor should we promote one aspect first and leave the other for later.

It is necessary to promote both personal changes and institutional and even legal transformations. This is the only way to achieve profound renewal and effective and lasting reform. In particular, the principle of responsibility, which describes a form of governance and leadership adapted to our time, calls for profound adjustments in the ways of proceeding at all levels of the life of the Church.

Follow Inés San Martín on Twitter: @inesanma

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