Iowa community leaders demand an end to hate and racism after mass shooting

Dozens of Iowans gathered at the Capitol Sunday afternoon to pay their respects to those who lost their lives in a tragic mass shooting in Buffalo, NY on May 14. “The biggest motivation for me to come out is the fear that what we are here to talk about today may come to our community, as well as elsewhere,” said Moses Ward of the Friendship Baptist Church at Ames. Speakers called out the 10 names of those who died as a grim reminder of the horrific end of their grocery trip. Community leaders now call for an end to racism, hatred and violence.” It could have been my I have a 7 year old son and I’m afraid he goes to school every day. The fear that he will walk down the street and violence will happen. What are we going to do as a community to end this violence? Ward said. Members of the public clung to every word at the memorial. One said it was important to hold ceremonies like these to bring everyone together after tragedies that happen too often. said Harold Alexander of St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral. The purpose of the event is to unify the community. And many believe it’s still possible, despite all our differences. “I hope we are moved away from hatred and towards unity and understanding,” Alexander said.

Dozens of Iowans gathered at the Capitol Sunday afternoon to pay their respects to those who lost their lives in a tragic mass shooting in Buffalo, NY on May 14.

“The biggest motivation for me to come out is the fear that what we are here to talk about today could happen in our community, as well as elsewhere,” Moses Ward of Friendship Baptist Church told Ames.

Speakers called out the 10 names of those who died for a somber reminder of the gruesome end to their trip to the grocery store.

Community leaders are now calling for an end to racism, hatred and violence.

“It could have been my family. I have a 7-year-old son and the fear that he goes to school every day. The fear that he walks down the street and violence happens. can we do as a community to stop this violence? said Ward.

Members of the public hung on to every word during the memorial. One said holding ceremonies like these is important to bring everyone together after tragedies that happen all too often.

“My emotions were mixed because it’s like a revolving door. It’s like a record that gets beaten and keeps playing over and over,” said Harold Alexander of St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral.

The purpose of the event is to unite the community. And many believe it’s still possible, despite all our differences.

“I hope we are moved away from hatred and towards unity and understanding,” Alexander said.

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