Roman catholic – Garibaldi Rosario http://garibaldirosario.org/ Sat, 18 Sep 2021 22:43:42 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.8 http://garibaldirosario.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-69.png Roman catholic – Garibaldi Rosario http://garibaldirosario.org/ 32 32 Yolanda López, artist who celebrated working class women, dies at 78 http://garibaldirosario.org/yolanda-lopez-artist-who-celebrated-working-class-women-dies-at-78/ http://garibaldirosario.org/yolanda-lopez-artist-who-celebrated-working-class-women-dies-at-78/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 22:38:58 +0000 http://garibaldirosario.org/yolanda-lopez-artist-who-celebrated-working-class-women-dies-at-78/ Yolanda López, an artist and activist who has created one of the most famous works of art in Chicano history by daringly remaking the Virgin of Guadalupe in her image – as a strong young brunette woman wearing shoes from running and a big smile – died on September 11. 3 at her home in […]]]>

Yolanda López, an artist and activist who has created one of the most famous works of art in Chicano history by daringly remaking the Virgin of Guadalupe in her image – as a strong young brunette woman wearing shoes from running and a big smile – died on September 11. 3 at her home in San Francisco. She was 78 years old.

The cause was complications from liver cancer, said his son, Rio Yañez, also an artist.

Ms. López has produced other types of work, including conceptual art installations and political posters, but her 1978 painting “Portrait of the Artist as Virgin of Guadalupe” is by far the most acclaimed and widely recognized. reproduced. It has appeared over the years in art books, feminist stories and Chicano anthologies. He has appeared on T-shirts and tattoos. And with similar work by Patssi Valdez and Ester Hernández, he inspired younger generations of Latino artists to rethink the Roman Catholic icon, a vision of the Virgin Mary popular with Mexicans and Mexican Americans.

Essentially, Ms. López took Guadalupe, the paragon of wise femininity, and set her free. The heavy and voluminous dress of the Virgin is redesigned in a short and sporty dress. His starry blue cloak becomes more of a superhero cape. She’s running instead of being stuck, and she looks happy.

Jill Dawsey, who organized a exhibition of Ms. López’s work slated to open in October at the Museum of Contemporary Art in San Diego – its first museum survey – called it a “striking revision of Guadalupe, stripped of its colonialist and patriarchal origins and transformed into an image of radical feminist optimism “. (It was drastic enough that Ms. López received periodic death threats.)

Few people realize the number of versions of the Virgin of Guadalupe that she created, including at least 20 collages and photomontages made as studies. Her final image of the Running Virgin was part of a larger triptych that celebrates working-class Chicanas of different ages and body types – and the idea of ​​matriarchy itself. One image shows her stocky mother repairing the Virgin’s mantle at a sewing table. Another has her grandmother sitting on the stacked fabric as if it were a throne, casually holding a knife and snakeskin.

A dedicated feminist and activist in the Chicano movement, Ms. López has also done explicitly political work. In 1978, she created a poster for the Chicano Rights Committee which exposes the hypocrisy of many anti-immigration sentiments by showing a man wearing an Aztec headdress pointing at the viewer like Uncle Sam with the message “Who is the illegal alien, PILGRIM?” “

In the late 1990s, she produced a series of popular prints, “Woman’s Work is Never Done,” to recognize the power of women’s work, from farm labor to child rearing. But spreading her work never created a source of income for her, and she got by teaching as an adjunct teacher at various colleges in the Bay Area.

“All of the work in our exhibit was borrowed directly from the artist, not from galleries or museums, and that rings a bell,” Ms. Dawsey of the San Diego Museum said. “Its priority has always been its ethics policy and commitments. She was never interested in the world of institutional art, which notoriously neglected Chicano artists.

Yolanda Margarita López, the eldest of four daughters, was born on November 1, 1942 in San Diego to Mortimer López and Margaret Franco. Her father left early and she was raised by her mother and maternal grandparents in a largely secular home. Her mother worked as a seamstress for the US Navy base in San Diego, among other employers, and Ms. López’s childhood dream was to become a costume designer.

Frustrated by the conservative values ​​of her hometown, she left the day after graduating from high school to live near San Francisco with her uncle and boyfriend. In 1965, she enrolled in San Francisco State College (now the University), where she joined militant groups like the Third World Liberation Front, which sought to reform curricula, hiring, and admissions for students. colored. She participated in her five-month strike, which resulted in the creation of a college of ethnic studies and a department of black studies.

In 1969, she was a founding member of a group called Los Siete de la Raza which sought justice for seven young Latino men accused of killing a police officer. (They were later acquitted.) She designed her newspaper, ¡Basta Ya !, as well as some posters, including the one who spun the American flag so that the stripes looked like prison bars on the faces of the men. According to Karen mary davalosEmory Douglas of the Black Panthers, who holds a Chair in Chicano and Latino Studies at the University of Minnesota, acted as a mentor by showing Ms. López the layout of cheap newspapers and cut-and-paste techniques. .

She then returned to Southern California and received her BA from San Diego State University in 1975. The following year, she began studying for an MA in Fine Arts at the University. from California to San Diego.

His graduation exhibition featured three important works: the Guadalupe triptych, done in oil pastel and paint on paper; a series of self-portraits in acrylic and oil, “In Dónde Vas, Chicana? Go to university“; and a series of eight-foot-tall charcoal drawings that she made of herself, her mother and grandmother on butcher’s paper. These drawings were intended to show” ordinary women ” She writes in an exhibition guide, to counter “the lack of positive portrayals of Latin Americans as normal, intelligent humans” and “the continued use of stereotypes such as the Latin bombshell and the wife / passive and patient mother.

“To Dónde Vas, Chicana?” Was born from a new hobby: running. During her MFA program, she discovered the love of running, both as a form of exercise and as a way to get around town without a car. This led to a series of self-portraits that show her running through the hills of La Jolla and past the new avant-garde Modernist buildings on campus. The works show her claiming her land as a Chicana woman in a predominantly white community. “I was the only visual arts graduate student to be a person of color,” she said in a 2020 interview.

After returning to San Francisco with his partner René Yañez, they had their son, Rio, in 1980. They had separated at the end of the decade.

Ms. López has increasingly turned to artistic creation from found objects and images. In 1985, she created a fake educational installation displaying blatantly stereotypical Mexico-themed memories, calling it “Things I Never Told My Son About Being Mexican.”

One of his last works is a collaboration with his son. In 2014, after receiving eviction notices for her apartment in the Mission neighborhood, Ms. López created an “eviction performance” with her help by selling her clothes, jewelry and household items at the Galería de la Raza. It was a garage sale that also served as an art exhibit – and, said Rio Yañez, “it was also a way to make a lot of noise about the eviction.” (She ended up staying in her apartment after a community organization stepped in and bought the building.)

Information on survivors other than her son was not immediately available.

More recently, Ms. López has reverted to her earlier works by making small reproductions on card stock, the size of business cards, to share with friends and colleagues. Many had sayings on the back. They were meant to be put in the wallet or pocket, like plastic prayer cards. She called them “pocket posters”.

“His approach has never been to create masterpieces for the elites,” Prof Davalos said. “She was always looking for ways to put art in people’s hands.”


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Seek God’s blessing http://garibaldirosario.org/seek-gods-blessing/ http://garibaldirosario.org/seek-gods-blessing/#respond Sat, 18 Sep 2021 08:08:16 +0000 http://garibaldirosario.org/seek-gods-blessing/ Patriot Day, or September 11, 2001, reports many stories of heroism. On the same day in 2001, firefighters, paramedics, police and ordinary citizens rushed in while others rushed. A few days later, armies of rescuers showed up to work in “the pit” or Ground Zero. The long-term physical toll it put on them while breathing […]]]>

Patriot Day, or September 11, 2001, reports many stories of heroism.

On the same day in 2001, firefighters, paramedics, police and ordinary citizens rushed in while others rushed. A few days later, armies of rescuers showed up to work in “the pit” or Ground Zero. The long-term physical toll it put on them while breathing the stale air has been told in many stories of sacrifice.

Pastor Gordon MacDonald felt God’s pat on the shoulder to work with rescuers clearing tons of debris in the hopes of finding survivors and cleaning up the site. He was associated with a Roman Catholic priest who wore his necklace. Pastor Mac wore work clothes thinking the priest was impractical.

He was about to find a much more important job than clearing rubble through his priestly partner. The Father simply walked through this sacred land asking people if he could bless them. If they would, and most would, he would say a simple prayer, putting his hand on their shoulder or forehead. The scriptures were mixed with prayer as the Holy Spirit led him. Soon the rescuers lined up to receive “the blessing.”


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“There is no credible religious argument against vaccines” http://garibaldirosario.org/there-is-no-credible-religious-argument-against-vaccines/ http://garibaldirosario.org/there-is-no-credible-religious-argument-against-vaccines/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 21:56:58 +0000 http://garibaldirosario.org/there-is-no-credible-religious-argument-against-vaccines/ As Americans increasingly seek religious exemptions from COVID-19 vaccination warrants, many religious leaders are telling them no. With more and more employers imposing mandates, the pressure for exemptions has grown stronger. The problem for many people whose faith leads them to oppose abortion is that the most widely used coronavirus vaccines have been tested on […]]]>

As Americans increasingly seek religious exemptions from COVID-19 vaccination warrants, many religious leaders are telling them no.

With more and more employers imposing mandates, the pressure for exemptions has grown stronger. The problem for many people whose faith leads them to oppose abortion is that the most widely used coronavirus vaccines have been tested on fetal cell lines developed over decades in laboratories, although vaccines themselves do not contain such material.

Among the religious leaders rejecting the exemptions is Reverend Robert Jeffress of First Baptist Dallas, who said he and his staff “neither offer nor encourage members to seek religious exemptions from vaccination mandates.”

“There is no credible religious argument against vaccines,” the senior pastor of the downtown mega-church told The Associated Press in an email. “Christians who are troubled by the use of a fetal cell line to test vaccines should also refrain from using Tylenol, Pepto Bismol, Ibuprofen and other products using the same cell line. ‘they are sincere in their objection. “

Although he aligned himself with former President Donald Trump – whose supporters are among the least vaccinated Americans – Jeffress has been a strong supporter of coronavirus vaccines. First Baptist held immunization clinics in the spring, with Jeffress encouraging his devotees to get vaccinated so they could worship safely in person.

Jeffress, who is vaccinated, also compared his positions on vaccination and abortion: “We say that life in the womb is a gift from God,” he told Fox News. “Well, life outside the womb is also a gift from God.”

The Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York laid out its own vaccine exemption position over the summer, saying any priest issuing a letter of exemption would “act in contradiction” to Pope Francis’ statements that receiving the vaccine. vaccine is morally acceptable and responsible.

The Vatican and the United States Conference of Catholic Bishops have said Catholics can receive the vaccines in good conscience given the lack of alternatives and the goal of alleviating suffering – even by opposing research even with a remote link to abortion.

A number of dioceses have adopted policies similar to New York’s, and the bishops of El Paso and Lexington, Ky., Have made vaccines mandatory for employees.

But other Catholic jurisdictions are more accommodating to exemptions. The Colorado Catholic Conference, the political arm of the state’s bishops, has posted a template letter for priests to sign online saying that an individual parishioner can rely on Catholic values ​​to oppose vaccines. The bishops of South Dakota have also taken this position.

A letter from the secretary would not necessarily be necessary for a person to obtain an exemption – federal law requires employers to make reasonable accommodations for “genuine” religious beliefs – although approval from the clergy may help strengthen the claim. of somebody.

Leaders of the Greek Orthodox Archdiocese of America said Thursday that although some people may have medical reasons for not receiving the vaccine, “there is no exemption in the Orthodox Church for its faithful from any vaccination for religious reasons “.

Likewise, the Evangelical Lutheran Church in America recently issued a statement encouraging the use of vaccines and stating that “there is no obvious basis for a religious exemption” in its own Lutheran tradition or in the Lutheran tradition. wider.

The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints does not provide religious exemptions for vaccines for members, according to church spokesperson Eric Hawkins. Leaders of the Utah-based faith have advocated for members to be vaccinated even though doctrine recognizes that it is up to the individual.

Some other religious groups, such as the Orthodox Union, an umbrella organization of Orthodox Judaism, and the United Methodist Church, have encouraged people to get vaccinated but have not issued policy statements on the exemptions.

The Fiqh Council of North America, made up of Islamic scholars, has advised Muslims to receive the Pfizer or Moderna vaccines and debunk the “unfounded rumors and myths” about them.

Documents from the Associated Press were used in this report.


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Survivors of Saint Joseph’s orphanage ask Catholic Church to fund therapy http://garibaldirosario.org/survivors-of-saint-josephs-orphanage-ask-catholic-church-to-fund-therapy/ http://garibaldirosario.org/survivors-of-saint-josephs-orphanage-ask-catholic-church-to-fund-therapy/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 12:53:03 +0000 http://garibaldirosario.org/survivors-of-saint-josephs-orphanage-ask-catholic-church-to-fund-therapy/ SOUTH BURLINGTON (AP) – Some of the residents of a long-closed Vermont orphanage want the Catholic Church to pay for therapy as they continue to recover from this they described as abuse by nuns and priests who were supposed to take care of them. The youngest members of the group called The Voices of St. […]]]>

SOUTH BURLINGTON (AP) – Some of the residents of a long-closed Vermont orphanage want the Catholic Church to pay for therapy as they continue to recover from this they described as abuse by nuns and priests who were supposed to take care of them.

The youngest members of the group called The Voices of St. Joseph’s Orphanage are in their late fifties. The oldest grow 80.

They held a meeting Thursday at a South Burlington hotel where they looked for ways to continue their recovery from the abuse many say they suffered at the hands of staff.

St. Joseph Orphanage in Burlington:Vermont bill informed by abuse of orphanage would end time limit for filing civil lawsuits

“It was a long and often painful process to achieve part of the healing in our lives and feeling that we are making a difference in our society, ”said Brenda Hannon, 68, of Williston who lived at the orphanage from 1959 to 1968.“ One of our most great achievements is that we are now visible to all of you and we are now believed, as to what has been done to us. “

Michael Ryan, from Buckingham, Va., Brenda Hannon, from Williston, Vt. And John Magnago, from Miami, left to right, pose in South Burlington, Vt., During an orphan reunion at St. Joseph's South Orphanage Burlington, VT, Thursday, September 16, 2021. Some residents of the long-closed Vermont orphanage want the Catholic Church to pay for therapy as they continue to recover from what they considered to be the abuse. most of them took place over half a century ago.

At a press conference, some of the former residents called on the church to do more to help them recover, including paying for their therapy. They said that in some cases the diocese was willing to pay for therapy, but only with therapists chosen by the diocese.

In a statement released Thursday, the diocese said its officials, including Bishop Christopher Coyne, have met with former residents of St. Joseph’s Orphanage one-on-one and will continue to do so.


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Emil Kubin obituary (2021) – Omaha, NE http://garibaldirosario.org/emil-kubin-obituary-2021-omaha-ne/ http://garibaldirosario.org/emil-kubin-obituary-2021-omaha-ne/#respond Fri, 17 Sep 2021 01:52:15 +0000 http://garibaldirosario.org/emil-kubin-obituary-2021-omaha-ne/ Kubin, Emil Joseph “Joe” July 21, 1940 – September 13, 2021 Emil Joseph “Joe” Kubin was born in Omaha on July 21, 1940 and died on September 13, 2021 after a long illness. With the exception of several years of military service, he has lived in Omaha his entire life. After graduating from Omaha South […]]]>
Kubin, Emil Joseph “Joe”

July 21, 1940 – September 13, 2021

Emil Joseph “Joe” Kubin was born in Omaha on July 21, 1940 and died on September 13, 2021 after a long illness. With the exception of several years of military service, he has lived in Omaha his entire life. After graduating from Omaha South High School, he worked in business before serving in the US Air Force during the Vietnam era. He married Carolyn Rae Kennedy in 1967 and retired from the Omaha School District in 2010.

Mr. Kubin was predeceased by his wife and parents, Emil and Edna Kubin. He is survived by his son, Andrew C., of Omaha; two granddaughters, Emily Rebecca from Landau, Germany; and Julia Mary-Amelia of Andover, New Jersey; his sister, Jeanette Kubin Fredericks (Dr. Robert J. Fredericks) of Morris Township, New Jersey; as well as 14 cousins ​​located across the United States.

VISIT: Sunday, September 19, 2021, from 2 p.m. to 4 p.m., with a ROSARY at 3:30 p.m., all at the Braman Mortuary (72 Chapelle St.). Mr. Kubin was a devout Roman Catholic. A CHRISTIAN BURIAL MASS will be celebrated on Monday, September 20, 2021 at 10 a.m. at St. James Catholic Church (4710 N 90th St). Interment: St. Johns Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, memorials can be sent to St. James Catholic Church.

MORTUE DE BRAMAN – 72nd St.

1702 N. 72nd St., Omaha, NE 68114 | (402) 391-2171

Posted by Omaha World-Herald on September 17, 2021.


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America’s largest Catholic church rises in Visalia – GV Wire http://garibaldirosario.org/americas-largest-catholic-church-rises-in-visalia-gv-wire/ http://garibaldirosario.org/americas-largest-catholic-church-rises-in-visalia-gv-wire/#respond Thu, 16 Sep 2021 16:22:42 +0000 http://garibaldirosario.org/americas-largest-catholic-church-rises-in-visalia-gv-wire/ VISALIA— It is billed as the largest Catholic parish in the United States and is being built about 200 miles north of Los Angeles, in what is often referred to as “the heart of California’s dairy industry.” With an estimated price tag of $ 18.5 million, St. Charles Borromeo Catholic Church will accommodate 3,200 people, […]]]>

VISALIA— It is billed as the largest Catholic parish in the United States and is being built about 200 miles north of Los Angeles, in what is often referred to as “the heart of California’s dairy industry.”

With an estimated price tag of $ 18.5 million, St. Charles Borromeo Catholic Church will accommodate 3,200 people, cover approximately 33,000 square feet and is expected to open in the spring of 2022. The church is under construction in Visalia, a town in Tulare County, and Catholic leaders hail it as the largest parish in the United States in terms of seating capacity.

The new church – funded by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Fresno and private donations – will feature 9-foot-high stained glass windows in its sanctuary, a baptismal font at the entrance to the parish, a Stations of the Cross with 14 devotional posts, and an octagon. dome-shaped accented with antique gold with murals of the four evangelists.

The church, which will reflect “California mission-inspired” architecture, will also feature a 48-foot-high devotional painting on canvas depicting portraits of archangels hovering above as saints kneel and worship the Blessed Virgin Mary. Trinity. The painting will pay homage to the region with images of citrus, cattle and green pastures that are synonymous with the agricultural central valley.

Visalia will house the largest Catholic church in America

Saint Charles Borromeo will be able to accommodate more people than the Cathedral of Christ – formerly the Crystal Cathedral, the mega-church of Robert H. Schuller taken over by the Roman Catholic Diocese of Orange in 2012 – which can accommodate 2,248 faithful. And while St. Matthew’s Catholic Church in Charlotte, North Carolina, may have over 11,000 registered families, it can accommodate approximately 2,100 people. The National Shrine in Washington, DC can accommodate 3,500 people but is not considered a parish church.

For Reverend Alex Chavez, pastor of the Catholic parish of the Good Shepherd in Visalia, the new church is a sign of “divine providence”, especially in the midst of the pandemic when “everything is drab and depressing, here in this small part of California, we’re building this juggernaut.

“It’s the country’s best-kept secret – little Visalia is building the largest parish church in modern US history,” Chavez said.

Visalia, a city of just over 140,000 residents, is squeezed between Fresno and Bakersfield in the San Joaquin Valley – an area where, according to US Census Bureau figures, Latinos are in the majority in six of its eight counties. The city has experienced population growth over the past decade, with the population increasing from 124,442 in 2010 to 141,384 in 2020, according to census figures.

While it may seem shocking that such a massive church is located in a county where, as a 2017 Visalia Times Delta headline noted, “there are almost more cows than people,” Chavez said. . do – is necessary to deal with the boom in the Catholic population in a region where, like much of the world, there is a severe shortage of priests.

Massive Church Tackles Catholic Population Boom

There has been uneven growth of Catholics in the United States over the past 40 years as the western and southern states have experienced a boom in the Catholic population, said Jonathon Wiggins, director of parish surveys at the Center. for Applied Research in the Apostolate.

In 1980, 16% of all Catholics were in the West, and by 2019 that number had risen to 27%, Wiggins said.

Growth is apparent in the Diocese of Fresno where the number of Catholics, between 1980 and 2019, increased from approximately 307,000 to 972,000.

Meanwhile, the number of active priests in the diocese has increased from 90 to 67 during the same period, Wiggins said. In 1980, the ratio of Catholics to active priests was 3 411 to 1. In 2019, the ratio was 14 511 to 1.

“In places like the West and the South, you see these bigger churches because you have a lot of Catholics there,” Wiggins said. “You have fewer priests than 40 years ago, while you get more Catholics, so you need bigger places.”

“What you are seeing in California is pretty significant growth,” he added.

The lack of priests a factor in the consolidation of parishes

To serve the growing Visalia congregations with fewer priests, the city’s three churches were merged in 2016 into what is known as the Catholic Parish of the Good Shepherd. A small congregation near Goshen is also part of this umbrella.

Before the pandemic, Chavez – a former engineer who grew up in the nearby town of Porterville – and two other priests traveled from church to church to celebrate 11 Masses in English and Spanish over the weekend. Now, in the wake of COVID-19, Chavez and another priest are holding a total of five weekend masses on Sunday in a church hall behind the construction of the new church.

“We were running like a headless chicken,” Chavez said, noting that the pandemic allowed them to consolidate masses in one place in the church hall.

Parish consolidation is happening across the country, said Scott Thumma, a sociologist of religion at Hartford Seminary. The shortage of priests is one of the main reasons, but it also varies by region, with their own growth or declining rates.

While the western and southern states have seen an increase in the number of Catholics, some churches in the east and midwest have seen a decline in attendance. Thumma said dioceses in those areas could look at deferred church maintenance and necessary repairs and decide it “makes more sense to consolidate.”

The Archdiocese of Chicago announced in May that a number of parishes would consolidate amid financial difficulties, declining attendance and a shortage of priests. Years earlier, in 2014, the Roman Catholic Archdiocese of New York announced the amalgamation of 112 parishes into 55 new parishes as it faced similar circumstances.

The project was delayed due to lack of funds and a pandemic

The idea for a new and larger church in the area emerged about two decades ago, said Chavez, when then-bishop John Thomas Steinbock envisioned a geographically central location to gather for celebrations, but that the mother church of the diocese, St. John’s Cathedral, could only accommodate 450 people.

The plans for the church began to take shape in 2008, when, according to The business journal, the diocese obtained a conditional use permit from the city to build a church, parish hall, school and other buildings on a 17-acre plot. The parish hall – where the faithful now gather for Sunday mass – has been built, but construction of the church has been stalled due to lack of funds. Efforts to build the church resumed in 2017, but suffered a number of delays during the pandemic.

Once Saint Charles Borromeo is finished, all Sunday Masses in Visalia and major diocesan celebrations, such as priestly ordinations, will take place there. Baptisms, funerals, weddings, confessions and daily masses will continue to be celebrated in the parishes of the neighborhood. “That’s how we keep them going all week,” Chavez said.

Across Visalia, the construction of the church is “the talk of the town,” said Chavez. But at first there was some resistance.

The faithful hesitate to spend small masses at the mega-church

Some worshipers, Chavez said, feared losing the identity of their neighborhood church and wanted to keep Sunday Mass in the parish where generations of families had attended. St. Mary’s Catholic Church, for example, is over 150 years old.

“They want to keep what they’re used to, the neighborhood church, and that’s where the resistance is,” Chavez said. “This is where the difficulty lies, letting go.

But Chavez said it simply wouldn’t be possible to continue weekend services in each individual church. “One or two of the parishes would be without a pastor,” he said.

Henry Medina, deacon and director of administration for Good Shepherd Catholic Parish, recognizes that parishioners will move from their small community churches to a mega-church that is not necessarily in their neighborhood. It is also an opportunity to unite the Catholics of the region, he said.

The new church, Medina said, will be a place where Latino, Portuguese, White, Vietnamese and Filipino parishioners as well as farm laborers, farmers and professionals can come together under one roof.

“You are starting to see, now, the mixing of all the different cultures,” he said. “All these parishes now have a new identity and what they had in the past is now historic.

Chavez added: “Now all the Catholics in the city of Visalia are under one roof united under one God.”

___

This content is written and produced by Religion News Service and distributed by The Associated Press. RNS and AP are joining forces on certain religious news content. RNS is solely responsible for this story.


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NBC News: The New Latin Landscape http://garibaldirosario.org/nbc-news-the-new-latin-landscape/ http://garibaldirosario.org/nbc-news-the-new-latin-landscape/#respond Wed, 15 Sep 2021 20:02:00 +0000 http://garibaldirosario.org/nbc-news-the-new-latin-landscape/ NBC News: The New Latin Landscape The rapid growth of Latin Americans is reshaping large states and small towns. Meet the faces of a new era. Update: September 15, 2021 at 1:02 p.m. PDT By Suzanne Gamboa, Nicole Acevedo In New Hampshire, a Roman Catholic church where Irish and French Canadian immigrants used to pray […]]]>

NBC News: The New Latin Landscape

The rapid growth of Latin Americans is reshaping large states and small towns. Meet the faces of a new era.

In New Hampshire, a Roman Catholic church where Irish and French Canadian immigrants used to pray now has the largest Latino congregation in the state. In the Deep South, a county in Georgia is one of the top 10 in the country in terms of diversity. Hispanics have accounted for more than half of the country’s population growth over the past decade. This isn’t reflected just in big cities, but in mountain towns, southern neighborhoods, and midwestern prairies. “The Latin American population has dispersed across the United States for years – a reflection of where the country’s population moves and where the opportunities lie,” said Mark Hugo Lopez, director of the United States. race and ethnicity research at the Pew Research Center. Click here to read NBC News’ full report on the New Latino Landscape.

In New Hampshire, a Roman Catholic church where Irish and French Canadian immigrants used to pray now has the largest Latino congregation in the state. In the Deep South, a county in Georgia is one of the top 10 in the country in terms of diversity.

Hispanics have accounted for more than half of the country’s population growth over the past decade. This isn’t reflected just in big cities, but in mountain towns, southern neighborhoods, and midwestern prairies.

“The Latin American population has dispersed across the United States for years – a reflection of where the country’s population moves and where the opportunities lie,” said Mark Hugo Lopez, director of the United States. race and ethnicity research at the Pew Research Center.

Click here to read NBC News’ full report on the New Latin Landscape.


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New cemetery planned for northwest Bakersfield despite neighborhood objections | New http://garibaldirosario.org/new-cemetery-planned-for-northwest-bakersfield-despite-neighborhood-objections-new/ http://garibaldirosario.org/new-cemetery-planned-for-northwest-bakersfield-despite-neighborhood-objections-new/#respond Mon, 13 Sep 2021 23:58:00 +0000 http://garibaldirosario.org/new-cemetery-planned-for-northwest-bakersfield-despite-neighborhood-objections-new/ The Roman Catholic Diocese of Fresno plans to build a new cemetery in northwest Bakersfield to accommodate an anticipated need for space. On Thursday, the Kern County Planning Commission narrowly approved a conditional use permit for the proposed 12-acre site for farmland south of Vega Meadows Road and east of Renfro Road. “The goal for […]]]>

The Roman Catholic Diocese of Fresno plans to build a new cemetery in northwest Bakersfield to accommodate an anticipated need for space.

On Thursday, the Kern County Planning Commission narrowly approved a conditional use permit for the proposed 12-acre site for farmland south of Vega Meadows Road and east of Renfro Road.

“The goal for us is to develop and maintain a beautiful cemetery, both inside and outside the property,” said Carlos Rascon, director of the cemetery of the Diocese of Fresno, during the Thursday committee meeting. “We want to be a good neighbor, proud of the appearance and condition of this property.

The 3-2 approval, with Commissioners Lauren Skidmore and Gregory McGiffney voting against, came over forceful objections from neighboring residents, who are primarily concerned that the cemetery will lower home values ​​and bring unwanted visitors to a peaceful neighborhood.

“The green spaces are beautiful,” owner Nicole Roberts said in a phone interview with The Californian. “It just doesn’t sound like anything I’ve ever wanted to live near.”

The project would be Bakersfield’s fifth active cemetery and the first to exclusively serve Catholics and their immediate families. The site would include a 14,726 square foot mausoleum, as well as an office and shop.

In the work for more than 10 years, Rascon told the meeting that the Catholic Church had considered several other properties, only to back down after realizing those properties were not suitable or that the price was too high. .

He said Bakersfield’s growth would eventually require an additional cemetery.

“The need for a cemetery comes from us or from another agency,” he told commissioners.

Local residents, however, feel differently. More than a dozen showed up at the committee meeting on Thursday to try to stop the approval. Concerns about traffic, the impact on local opinions, even the prospect of explaining the death to children have been cited as reasons the cemetery has moved elsewhere.

“If someone wants to build a cemetery, that’s obviously good, we need cemeteries, but do it in a place where there are already no houses,” said a woman who identified herself. as Mandy Cunningham during the public comments portion of the meeting on Thursday. “It’s just not a neighborhood thing to do… If you’re a good neighbor, you wouldn’t build next to us. “

Although the commission has cleared the cemetery to go ahead, an appeal could take the matter to the Kern County Oversight Board, which could overturn the approval.

According to planning documents, funeral services will be held at the cemetery from 10 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., with visits permitted from 8 a.m. to 7 p.m. The diocese expects the site to attract 5-10 visitors on weekdays and 15-20 on weekends.

You can reach Sam Morgen at 661-395-7415. You can also follow him on Twitter @smorgenTBC.


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Covington Latin School Joins Thomas Celebration http://garibaldirosario.org/covington-latin-school-joins-thomas-celebration/ http://garibaldirosario.org/covington-latin-school-joins-thomas-celebration/#respond Sat, 11 Sep 2021 16:03:07 +0000 http://garibaldirosario.org/covington-latin-school-joins-thomas-celebration/ Covington, Ky., September 11, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Covington Latin School (CLS) is a coeducational Catholic high school specializing in advanced and accelerated education in Covington, Ky. The Covington Latin School is considered a sister school of Thomas More University with shared diocesan leadership. Sunday September 12e, 2021, Covington Latin School will open its hall […]]]>

Covington, Ky., September 11, 2021 (GLOBE NEWSWIRE) – Covington Latin School (CLS) is a coeducational Catholic high school specializing in advanced and accelerated education in Covington, Ky. The Covington Latin School is considered a sister school of Thomas More University with shared diocesan leadership. Sunday September 12e, 2021, Covington Latin School will open its hall to host a Founders Day reception in honor of the 100e anniversary at the end of the 10:00 am mass in the Cathedral Basilica of the Assumption, celebrated by Bishop Foys.

The Mass will include the recognition by Bishop Foys of the centenary celebration of Thomas More University and will honor the administration, board of directors, officers, staff and students of the University. Bishop Foys will also recognize on September 12e, 2021 as Thomas More University Founders Day.

“We are grateful to the Director of Covington Latin, Dr John Kennedy, and the staff at the Latin School for their generous hospitality and willingness to help organize our Founders Day reception,” said Dr Joseph Chillo. , President of Thomas More University, “Covington Latin’s connection with Thomas More University dates back to the early 1920s, when Villa Madonna College began admitting men. It is only fitting that we celebrate our centenary with them. “

Immediately after the end of Mass, all parties are invited to a reception in honor of Founders Day and to celebrate the centenary of Thomas More University at Covington Latin School. There, University President Thomas More Chillo will greet guests and make brief remarks on the significance of the anniversary, the university’s roots in Covington, and links to the Covington Latin School. Dr Judith A. Marlowe, 1969 Thomas More University graduate and chair of the University’s Board of Trustees, will lead those gathered to toast the first 100 years of Thomas More University and the second century future.

“On behalf of the staff, faculty and students of Covington Latin School, we are honored to host this reception to celebrate the centenary of Thomas More University,” said Amy Darpel, Director of School Advancement Latina from Covington and graduated from Thomas More University in 1994., “The bonds between our two institutions come from our very beginnings, they are everlasting and incredibly important to the advancement of our entire community. “

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About the Covington Latin School: www.CovingtonLatin.org | #CovingtonLatin

Covington Latin School is a mixed Roman Catholic, accelerated and college preparatory college and high school that offers classical education to gifted students. Our unique educational programs allow gifted students to evolve at a pace and complexity suited to their academic and emotional social needs. The goal is to train Christian leaders by challenging them to reach their academic, intellectual, social and moral potential. Since its inception in 1923, the Latin School has operated under the auspices of the Roman Catholic Bishop of the Diocese of Covington, Kentucky. The school is accredited by both the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools (SACS) and the Cognia Global Educational Accreditation Commission, and is certified by the US Department of Education as a Blue Ribbon school. Covington Latin School was ranked as the # 1 private school in Northern Kentucky by Cincinnati Magazine and was named one of the top 3 schools in the state of Kentucky.

Learn more and access registration at www.CovingtonLatin.org.

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Priestly celibacy holds back the Catholic Church (opinion of Stephen Bowman) http://garibaldirosario.org/priestly-celibacy-holds-back-the-catholic-church-opinion-of-stephen-bowman/ http://garibaldirosario.org/priestly-celibacy-holds-back-the-catholic-church-opinion-of-stephen-bowman/#respond Wed, 08 Sep 2021 17:21:44 +0000 http://garibaldirosario.org/priestly-celibacy-holds-back-the-catholic-church-opinion-of-stephen-bowman/ Stephen Sarsfield Bowman is President of Peregrine Senior Living, based in Syracuse. Some mothers are so full of grace and love that they slowly move forward in their world offering unconditional compassion to all, but seldom see the crisis forming in their own lives. I fear the Roman Catholic Church is an example of a […]]]>

Stephen Sarsfield Bowman is President of Peregrine Senior Living, based in Syracuse.

Some mothers are so full of grace and love that they slowly move forward in their world offering unconditional compassion to all, but seldom see the crisis forming in their own lives. I fear the Roman Catholic Church is an example of a selfless mother who seems reckless and blind to the seeds of her own self-destruction, and remains inert, seemingly paralyzed.

The crisis I am talking about is the disappearance of our priests and the traditional orientation of the church. Over the past 50 years, our number of priests in the United States has almost halved, from 60,000 to about 30,000 today. And of the remaining active priests, 50% are over 70 years old. We are quickly becoming a truncated religious body with dying leadership.

Of course, the unspeakable sex scandal within our clergy has contributed to these falling numbers, but so has the puzzling insistence on celibacy. This was never the rule in the early church, for Saint Peter was married (Luke 4:38) and Saint Paul advised his priests to limit their wives to one (Timothy 3: 2,12). In addition, the Eastern Catholic Church has always allowed its priests to marry and they have always been in “communion” with Rome. (To see the Nicene Creed and his devotion to “one holy Catholic and Apostolic Church”). In fact, the celibacy mandate did not become the rule until the first Lateran Council in 1123, and this was motivated more by a concern for the property rights of the descendants of priests than by holiness.

The church seemed to have recognized the practical absurdity of its position in 1980, when Pope John Paul II authorized a special dispensation for priests of the Episcopal and Lutheran faith from converting to Catholicism even if they were married with children. . The first of these converts authorized by Pope John Paul II was a Jew, a convert to episcopalism, married and father of 11 children. Since then, around 100 married men have become priests in this country. To me, it seems intellectually misleading that the church allows married priests today, but only if they are converted.

It became a reality for me this summer when my wife and I vacationed in Maine. I saw a man with a priest’s necklace on a hot day. We started talking and it turned out to be a Catholic priest, convert, married with six children. Two things really stood out in my mind. First, he was incredibly happy. A smile never left his face, and he beamed. Second, he couldn’t help it and bragged about the quality of his wife and the joy of their marriage.

Of course, I was enchanted by her joyful vocation and also by her beautiful marriage, but I was also saddened by the thought of my many friends who left the priesthood because their love of marriage equaled their love of Christ. These two loves became their essence, but in the church today, these loves were irreconcilable.

This does not seem to be a lost point for Pope Francis. After all, his namesake Saint Francis, in a time of corruption, was ordered to rebuild the church, and perhaps this pope took this warning to heart. On the feast of Saint Francis in 2019, the Pope summoned the Pan-Amazonian Synod to explore “new avenues for the church”. One of those topics was to be the ordination of married men to the priesthood, where shortages in Brazil leave many to wait literally years to see a priest. Unfortunately, the acrimony that followed left the topic unanswered, but at least it made the order of the day. (But if you want to read brutally anti-Christian attacks on the Pope, do your own Google search.)

If the Roman Catholic Church were serious about our priesthood crisis, there is a lot it could change. We could allow married men to become priests, and they could welcome women to the seminary. (By the way, I know of a priest in Buffalo who wears an “ordain a woman” button at every mass.) We could also consider raising married deacons to our priests, or we could allow our former clerics to take over. the roles. Many of these ancient clerics remain spiritual giants and would fill gaping holes in our deteriorating church.

But the reality is that as our world becomes more secular and materialistic, our society is crying out for more spiritual guidance and direction. In my opinion, the Catholic Church needs to become more proactive and owe us more comfort and healing as we rapidly approach an era where priests will increasingly rarely occupy the altar on Sunday. It could become a lonely trip for my children and grandchildren.

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