Catholic mass – Garibaldi Rosario http://garibaldirosario.org/ Mon, 23 May 2022 00:29:19 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://garibaldirosario.org/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-69.png Catholic mass – Garibaldi Rosario http://garibaldirosario.org/ 32 32 Iowa community leaders demand an end to hate and racism after mass shooting https://garibaldirosario.org/iowa-community-leaders-demand-an-end-to-hate-and-racism-after-mass-shooting/ Sun, 22 May 2022 22:43:00 +0000 https://garibaldirosario.org/iowa-community-leaders-demand-an-end-to-hate-and-racism-after-mass-shooting/ Dozens of Iowans gathered at the Capitol Sunday afternoon to pay their respects to those who lost their lives in a tragic mass shooting in Buffalo, NY on May 14. “The biggest motivation for me to come out is the fear that what we are here to talk about today may come to our community, […]]]>

Dozens of Iowans gathered at the Capitol Sunday afternoon to pay their respects to those who lost their lives in a tragic mass shooting in Buffalo, NY on May 14. “The biggest motivation for me to come out is the fear that what we are here to talk about today may come to our community, as well as elsewhere,” said Moses Ward of the Friendship Baptist Church at Ames. Speakers called out the 10 names of those who died as a grim reminder of the horrific end of their grocery trip. Community leaders now call for an end to racism, hatred and violence.” It could have been my I have a 7 year old son and I’m afraid he goes to school every day. The fear that he will walk down the street and violence will happen. What are we going to do as a community to end this violence? Ward said. Members of the public clung to every word at the memorial. One said it was important to hold ceremonies like these to bring everyone together after tragedies that happen too often. said Harold Alexander of St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral. The purpose of the event is to unify the community. And many believe it’s still possible, despite all our differences. “I hope we are moved away from hatred and towards unity and understanding,” Alexander said.

Dozens of Iowans gathered at the Capitol Sunday afternoon to pay their respects to those who lost their lives in a tragic mass shooting in Buffalo, NY on May 14.

“The biggest motivation for me to come out is the fear that what we are here to talk about today could happen in our community, as well as elsewhere,” Moses Ward of Friendship Baptist Church told Ames.

Speakers called out the 10 names of those who died for a somber reminder of the gruesome end to their trip to the grocery store.

Community leaders are now calling for an end to racism, hatred and violence.

“It could have been my family. I have a 7-year-old son and the fear that he goes to school every day. The fear that he walks down the street and violence happens. can we do as a community to stop this violence? said Ward.

Members of the public hung on to every word during the memorial. One said holding ceremonies like these is important to bring everyone together after tragedies that happen all too often.

“My emotions were mixed because it’s like a revolving door. It’s like a record that gets beaten and keeps playing over and over,” said Harold Alexander of St. Paul’s Episcopal Cathedral.

The purpose of the event is to unite the community. And many believe it’s still possible, despite all our differences.

“I hope we are moved away from hatred and towards unity and understanding,” Alexander said.

More coverage:

]]>
Disabled Catholics share their vision for a synodal church https://garibaldirosario.org/disabled-catholics-share-their-vision-for-a-synodal-church/ Sat, 21 May 2022 14:20:09 +0000 https://garibaldirosario.org/disabled-catholics-share-their-vision-for-a-synodal-church/ People are pictured in a screenshot of a Zoom meeting with Vatican officials during a listening session with 30 people with disabilities on May 19, 2022. The meeting was part of the preparation process for the Synod of Bishops. (CNS Photo courtesy Dicastery for Laity, Family and Life) VATICAN CITY – Catholics with disabilities can […]]]>

People are pictured in a screenshot of a Zoom meeting with Vatican officials during a listening session with 30 people with disabilities on May 19, 2022. The meeting was part of the preparation process for the Synod of Bishops. (CNS Photo courtesy Dicastery for Laity, Family and Life)

VATICAN CITY – Catholics with disabilities can and want to be active members of the Church and missionary disciples, but this will require challenging discrimination, exclusion and paternalism, participants in a listening session say online for the Synod of Bishops.

The Dicastery for Laity, Family and Life, in collaboration with the General Secretariat of the Synod of Bishops, sponsored a two-hour session on May 19 with representatives of episcopal conferences and international Catholic associations to hear directly from Catholics with disabilities , “who are often on the fringes of our churches,” according to a press release.

“Although many of them have already been involved in the meetings promoted by parishes, dioceses and associations” in preparation for the World Synod of Bishops in 2023, “the meeting was in fact the launch of a real process international synod dedicated to them,” the statement said.

Some 30 participants with sensory, physical or cognitive disabilities joined the meeting from more than 20 countries and shared in their own languages ​​- including three types of sign language – their thoughts on the synod questions: “How do we walk with Jesus and our brothers and sisters? sisters to proclaim it? For the future, what does the Spirit ask of our church to grow in our journey with Jesus and with our brothers and sisters to announce it?

“Four moving testimonies from Liberia, Ukraine, France and Mexico drew attention to the need to overcome discrimination, exclusion and paternalism,” the Vatican said.

A French woman with Down syndrome, who received a mandate from her bishop as a catechist and evangelist, told the assembly: “At birth, I could have been aborted. I am happy to live. I love everyone and thank God for creating me.

Father Schonstatt Alexandre Awi Mello, secretary of the Dicastery for Laity, Family and Life, told participants that one of the challenges of the synodal process is to “overcome all the prejudices” of people who think that someone who has difficulty expressing himself “don’t have a personal thought or anything interesting to communicate.

The Dicastery and Synod Office hope to continue the discussion with an in-person meeting, and participants in the online session have already committed to drafting a document to submit to Synod.

]]>
The first synodal church | National Catholic Journalist https://garibaldirosario.org/the-first-synodal-church-national-catholic-journalist/ Fri, 20 May 2022 03:05:42 +0000 https://garibaldirosario.org/the-first-synodal-church-national-catholic-journalist/ “I have called you friends” (John 15:14). Acts 15:22-31; John 15:12-17 The diocese here is completing a study on the deanery that will culminate when the bishop presents a plan for 18 of the city’s parishes. Changing demographics and the shortage of priests have largely led to the closure and merger of some. The consultation […]]]>

“I have called you friends” (John 15:14).

Acts 15:22-31; John 15:12-17

The diocese here is completing a study on the deanery that will culminate when the bishop presents a plan for 18 of the city’s parishes. Changing demographics and the shortage of priests have largely led to the closure and merger of some. The consultation was impacted by two years of pandemic and low participation. Using an external consultant with templates and a timeline has produced administrative decisions that will take time to digest.

Today’s readings look at life in the early church as it wrestled with one of its most critical decisions at the first Jerusalem Council: should full church membership be offered to the Gentile communities evangelized by the missionaries Paul and Barnabas. The consensus was that Gentiles did not need to submit to Torah, circumcision, and other Jewish requirements to be welcomed into the church. The only requirement was faith in Jesus, his saving death and resurrection. Without this key decision at the outset, the church would have remained a sect within Judaism instead of universal in scope to anyone drawn to Jesus and the gospel.

Fierce disputes over having separate Eucharists for Jewish and Gentile converts had brought Peter and Paul into open conflict and threatened the unity of the church. In the end, these complex issues were resolved unanimously because the Holy Spirit had clearly blessed the missionary efforts.

The expansion of the Church was blessed by the active presence of the risen Jesus, whose gifts of healing and reconciliation flowed freely from the hands of the missionaries. These graces reproduced the many signs and wonders of the gospel story of Jesus as the crippled were healed and opposition through trial and imprisonment did not prevent transformed preachers from proclaiming Jesus as the Christ.

Most remarkable in the accounts of the Council of Jerusalem was the confidence of “the whole Church” that God was with them and that their decisions were made by “us and the Holy Spirit”, with an outpouring of joy and freedom. Likewise, members of the movement shared the spirit of friendship with Jesus. Love went far beyond obedience or fearing a God on a mountaintop. Jesus had been among them, sharing our humanity. He had submitted to death on the cross to affirm God’s unconditional mercy for sinners. He had loved them not as servants but as friends and he had told them to love each other as a sign that he was one with God.

It was an overwhelming experience to be chosen, named, loved and sent to the ancient world. It is this same love emanating from a Jesus who is always with his church and from a Spirit that moved Pope Francis to call believers to the same synodal church. God is alive in the love shared by those who walk together, encountering truth in one another and trusting God to help them apply the gospel to the difficult issues of our time.

We are now, after all, the same church, and as we look forward to Pentecost, we must trust that the Holy Spirit will come as promised to fill us with the courage we need to pass on our faith as the first generation. What would we be without their example and their courage?

]]>
Plans filed to demolish two Catholic churches – including one built 183 years ago https://garibaldirosario.org/plans-filed-to-demolish-two-catholic-churches-including-one-built-183-years-ago/ Wed, 18 May 2022 09:52:13 +0000 https://garibaldirosario.org/plans-filed-to-demolish-two-catholic-churches-including-one-built-183-years-ago/ Proposals for the demolition of two Catholic churches in Oldham have been tabled. The Diocese of Salford has asked council to have two of its former churches in the borough demolished. The separate applications are for St Mary’s Church and Rectory on Ruth Street, and RC Church of the Sacred Heart on Whetstone Hill Road. […]]]>

Proposals for the demolition of two Catholic churches in Oldham have been tabled.

The Diocese of Salford has asked council to have two of its former churches in the borough demolished. The separate applications are for St Mary’s Church and Rectory on Ruth Street, and RC Church of the Sacred Heart on Whetstone Hill Road.

St Mary’s Church was opened in 1839 in response to a request for a Catholic church in the Oldham area and was designed by Matthew Hadfield, the architect of Salford Cathedral.

READ MORE:
Man’s fury at housing association as he goes without heat for SIX WEEKS after boiler fails

The diocese says both churches are currently unused and have fallen into a “dilapidated and abandoned state in recent times due to vandalism”. The application says they are empty due to lack of attendance at the local parish.

“Due to disuse, the church building has fallen into a dilapidated state, suffering from high level water seepage, dry and wet rot on the timbers,” he adds.

However, the pulpit organ has already been removed and salvaged, along with all other items of “historical significance”.



The interior of St. Mary’s Church

The diocese says there are currently no plans to redevelop or restore the sites, but building materials will be recycled where possible. “Approval for demolition is sought at this time to prevent the building from further deteriorating and becoming unsafe,” the planning documents add.

He expects the demolition of St Mary’s – which would be a mix of manual and mechanical methods – to be completed in August, with the demolition of Sacred Heart completed in November.

Sign up for the Mancunian Way newsletter to get an in-depth look at the biggest stories from our region every day of the week

]]>
Catholic leader blasts Israeli conduct at journalist’s funeral https://garibaldirosario.org/catholic-leader-blasts-israeli-conduct-at-journalists-funeral/ Mon, 16 May 2022 19:20:05 +0000 https://garibaldirosario.org/catholic-leader-blasts-israeli-conduct-at-journalists-funeral/ The Holy Land’s top Catholic cleric on Monday condemned the beating by police of mourners carrying the coffin of Al Jazeera journalist Shireen Abu Akleh on Monday, accusing the authorities of violating human rights and missing of respect to the Catholic Church. Latin Patriarch Pierbattista Pizzaballa told reporters at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Jerusalem that […]]]>

The Holy Land’s top Catholic cleric on Monday condemned the beating by police of mourners carrying the coffin of Al Jazeera journalist Shireen Abu Akleh on Monday, accusing the authorities of violating human rights and missing of respect to the Catholic Church.

Latin Patriarch Pierbattista Pizzaballa told reporters at St. Joseph’s Hospital in Jerusalem that Friday’s incident, broadcast worldwide, was a “disproportionate use of force” against a large crowd of people waving Palestinian flags as they drove from the hospital to a nearby Catholic church. in the Old City of Jerusalem. The attack drew worldwide condemnation and added to shock and outrage over the death of Abu Akleh, who was killed while covering a shooting in the occupied West Bank.

The police attack, Pizzaballa told reporters, “is a serious violation of international norms and regulations, including the fundamental human right of freedom of religion, which must also be respected in a public space.” Leaders and clergy from other Christian churches sat nearby.

There was no immediate Israeli response.

Israel and the Palestinians are locked in a war of stories over the murder of Abu Akleh. The journalist, a Palestinian-American, Catholic and veteran of the satellite channel for 25 years, was shot dead on Wednesday while covering an Israeli military raid in the Jenin refugee camp. She wore a blue vest clearly marked “Press”. Abu Akleh was a household name across the Arab world, known for documenting the hardships of Palestinian life under Israeli rule.

Palestinian officials and witnesses, including journalists who accompanied her, say she was killed by army fire. The army, after initially saying Palestinian gunmen may have been responsible, later backtracked and now says it is unclear who fired the fatal bullet.

The United States and the United Nations are among many critics of police repression at funerals.

Israeli police said they agreed funeral arrangements with Abu Akleh’s family in advance, and that a crowd of mourners violated that agreement by walking with the coffin, instead of driving with it, and by shouting nationalist slogans.

But Abu Akleh’s brother Anton disputed these claims. He said Monday that the family had entrusted the funeral arrangements to the Israel Police.

He said the police did not want Palestinian slogans or flags. But he said ‘it’s something we can’t control’.

Anton said the police also wanted to know the funeral itinerary and there was no other agreement. “We wanted to put the coffin in the car,” he said. “We were going towards the car when they attacked us.”

Israel Police have launched an investigation into the conduct of the officers who attacked the mourners, nearly knocking the coffin off the pallbearers. Israel’s public broadcaster Kan released what it said was security camera footage showing police bursting into the hospital ahead of the funeral.

Meanwhile, Israel and the Palestinians continued to argue over the shooting investigation.

Israel searched for the bullet, saying it must be analyzed by ballistics experts to reach definitive conclusions. Palestinian officials refused, saying they did not trust Israel. Rights groups say Israel has a poor record of investigating wrongdoing by its security forces.

After earlier saying they would accept an outside partner, the Palestinians said late Sunday they would handle the investigation on their own and deliver results very soon.

“We also refused to have an international investigation because we have confidence in our abilities as a security institution,” Prime Minister Mohammed Shtayyeh announced. “We will not hand over any evidence to anyone as we know these people are capable of falsifying facts.”

Amid the wrangling, several research and human rights groups have launched their own investigations.

Bellingcat, an international consortium of researchers based in the Netherlands, has published an analysis of video and audio evidence collected from social media. The material came from Palestinian and Israeli military sources, and the analysis looked at factors including timestamps, video locations, shadows, and forensic audio analysis of the shots.

The group found that while gunmen and Israeli soldiers were both in the area, the evidence supported testimonies that Israeli fire had killed Abu Akleh.

“Based on what we were able to examine, the IDF (Israeli soldiers) were in the closest position and had the clearest line of sight to Abu Akleh,” said Giancarlo Fiorella, the lead researcher for the IDF. analysis.

Fiorella acknowledged that the analysis cannot be 100% certain without evidence such as the bullet, the weapons used by the army and the GPS positions of the Israeli forces. But he said the emergence of additional evidence generally bolsters preliminary conclusions and almost never invalidates them.

___

Kellman reported from Tel Aviv, Israel.

]]>
Churches hold Sunday morning services for victims of Tops shooting https://garibaldirosario.org/churches-hold-sunday-morning-services-for-victims-of-tops-shooting/ Sun, 15 May 2022 00:25:00 +0000 https://garibaldirosario.org/churches-hold-sunday-morning-services-for-victims-of-tops-shooting/ The vigil is scheduled for 9 a.m. near the store and will include members of Voice Buffalo, Stop the Violence Coalition, Buffalo Peacemakers and others. BUFFALO, NY – Several community churches on Buffalo’s east side will hold Sunday prayer services in honor of the victims killed in the Buffalo mass shooting. True Bethel Baptist Church […]]]>

The vigil is scheduled for 9 a.m. near the store and will include members of Voice Buffalo, Stop the Violence Coalition, Buffalo Peacemakers and others.

BUFFALO, NY – Several community churches on Buffalo’s east side will hold Sunday prayer services in honor of the victims killed in the Buffalo mass shooting.

True Bethel Baptist Church holds services at 10 a.m. They are located at 977 East Ferry Street in Buffalo.

Elim Christian Fellowship, located at 70 Chalmers Avenue, will hold services at 8:30 a.m. If you can’t attend, they also stream their services live on their website.

The Macedonian Missionary Baptist Church will hold morning services at 11:30 a.m. They are located at 237 E North Street in Buffalo. You can watch their live stream here: https://macedoniabuffalo.com/watch.

St. John’s Baptist Church at 184 Goodell Street will hold worship services beginning at 9:30 a.m.

A vigil is also scheduled for Sunday morning to mourn and remember the victims of Saturday afternoon’s shooting at Tops Market on Jefferson Ave. in Buffalo.

Members of Voice Buffalo, Stope the Violence Coalition, the Buffalo Peacemakers and others will gather near the store at 9 a.m.

In light of Saturday’s shooting at Tops Market on Jefferson Avenue in Buffalo, a local church is asking the community to come together in prayer.

The Reverend Dr. Todd Leach, Senior Pastor of Westminster Presbyterian Church in Buffalo, posted the following note on Saturday evening:

Dear Westminster community,

Details of the horrific shooting in our Buffalo community have yet to be fully released, but the news so far is proving nightmarish. What we do know at this point is that one beautiful Saturday turned tragic as dozens of our neighbors suffered a vicious atrocity by someone with a gun, who was apparently on a diabolical mission to steal the innocent life.

We certainly need more than thoughts and prayers, but I believe these can be a start. Tomorrow (Sunday) evening at 5:00 p.m. we will meet in the sanctuary to offer a prayer service. I encourage you to attend so that we can uplift our neighbors in prayer as we commit to journeying alongside them. Together, may we more fully live our motto of being a city of good neighbours.

Meet at church and in the community,
Todd

Buffalo police told 2 On Your Side that in all, 13 people were shot. Eleven of the victims are African American, two are white. Four of the victims were store employees, they said. An ECMC spokesperson said they are treating the three survivors who are currently in stable condition.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AduN91_uC1A

]]>
Campaign to rebuild Englewood church destroyed by fire kicks off on Sunday https://garibaldirosario.org/campaign-to-rebuild-englewood-church-destroyed-by-fire-kicks-off-on-sunday/ Fri, 13 May 2022 19:49:00 +0000 https://garibaldirosario.org/campaign-to-rebuild-englewood-church-destroyed-by-fire-kicks-off-on-sunday/ Most people see the ruins of a burnt-out church at the corner of South Stewart and West Englewood Avenues. But the senior pastor of the Antioch Missionary Baptist Church sees a new chapel, health and wellness center and youth center. And he imagines cutting the ribbon for the new complex at Easter 2024. “I envision […]]]>

Most people see the ruins of a burnt-out church at the corner of South Stewart and West Englewood Avenues.

But the senior pastor of the Antioch Missionary Baptist Church sees a new chapel, health and wellness center and youth center. And he imagines cutting the ribbon for the new complex at Easter 2024.

“I envision it to be the heart of the community,” said Reverend Gerald M. Dew. “Not just a place where people from the church come to attend church, but a place where people from the community come to experience support and encouragement and love and lessons and of the Lord.”

The chapel will be a space where the congregation can come together and worship, celebrate their faith and encourage each other through “the kind of love that was shown on that hill called Calvary,” Dew said.

The health and wellness center will include a gym, a room for recreational activities and will house the church’s health ministry. Meanwhile, the youth center will provide mentorship, life skills classes and Christian education to children and teens in the community.

“I hope we can galvanize this energy so that even when this is over we can tackle other issues: gun violence, teenage pregnancy, school dropout rates, alcoholism, domestic violence,” Dew said. “If we can get together and do that, then we can get together and do anything.”

Antioch caught fire on April 15 and reignited several times in the following days. The damage necessitated the complete demolition of the historic building. The only thing to save was the church’s iconic neon cross sign.

The iconic neon sign of the Antioch Missionary Baptist Church is the only part of the structure that will be saved.

Cheyanne M. Daniels/Sun-Times File

Demolition began on April 20. Only one wall remained standing on Friday. Demolition is expected to be completed within the next two weeks.

“When I left on Wednesday, the south wall and the west wall were still standing,” Dew said. “When I came back this morning, I walked into the church and saw these two (disappeared) walls. I felt almost the same as when I saw the flames coming out of the roof. It was devastating.

No one has yet calculated how much the new complex might cost, although the church has so far raised $40,000. Antioch will launch a new fundraising effort on Sunday with churches from North Carolina, New York, Tennessee, Mississippi, California and even the Netherlands joining the Englewood church in prayer at 11 a.m. central.

The Reverend Dr. Gerald M. Dew speaks at a press conference outlining the campaign deployment effort

The Rev. Gerald M. Dew on Friday introduced the “Help Antioch Build” campaign to rebuild the Antioch Missionary Baptist Church.

“Any of us could have experienced this tragedy,” said Tyone D. Hughes, senior pastor of Third Baptist Church in Chicago, which helped organize Sunday’s event. “We are all at a moment’s notice from a tragedy. And so it was important for the church to be its own custodian to help one of us, part of all of us, rebuild what is a historic staple in our city.

In addition to raising funds for the new facility, Hughes said Antioch hopes Sunday’s event can become a model of global collaboration.

“The church sometimes has an unfortunate profile that we can’t work together because of our differences in doxology and theologies,” Hughes said. “We want to prove that our differences do not separate us. We hope this will become a national model for us to work together not just now, but in the future.

Sunday’s event will be streamed live on Antioch’s website, ambcchicago.org. Donations can also be made through the site.

Pastor Tyone D. Hughes speaks at a press conference outlining the campaign rollout effort

Tyone D. Hughes, senior pastor at Chicago’s Third Baptist Church, helped organize Sunday’s kickoff for the “Help Antioch Build” campaign.

Cheyanne M. Daniels is a reporter for the Chicago Sun-Times viaReport for Americaa non-profit journalism program that aims to strengthen the newspaper’s coverage of communities on the South and West Sides.

]]>
Catholic parishioners in the Archdiocese of St. John’s are in an ’emotional state’ as time draws to a close to redeem their churches https://garibaldirosario.org/catholic-parishioners-in-the-archdiocese-of-st-johns-are-in-an-emotional-state-as-time-draws-to-a-close-to-redeem-their-churches/ Thu, 12 May 2022 09:32:48 +0000 https://garibaldirosario.org/catholic-parishioners-in-the-archdiocese-of-st-johns-are-in-an-emotional-state-as-time-draws-to-a-close-to-redeem-their-churches/ ST. JOHN’S, NL — With bidding due for Catholic Church properties in the Archdiocese of St. John’s weeks away, pledging campaigns and GoFundMe campaigns are heating up as parishes try to make the cut the finish line. “Things are going pretty well,” said Rick Power, chairman of the finance committee at St. Teresa’s Church in […]]]>

ST. JOHN’S, NL — With bidding due for Catholic Church properties in the Archdiocese of St. John’s weeks away, pledging campaigns and GoFundMe campaigns are heating up as parishes try to make the cut the finish line.

“Things are going pretty well,” said Rick Power, chairman of the finance committee at St. Teresa’s Church in St. John’s.

But outside interests could also bid on the site, which overlooks Mundy Pond in central St. John’s.

There is no guarantee that the parishes will win.

Parishes in the archdiocese are scrambling to save their churches, named along with various other properties on a tender list as part of the Corp’s insolvency. Episcopal Church of St. John’s, the corporate branch of the church.

It is the result of the Archdiocese losing its fight for compensation for victims of abuse at the former Mount Cashel Orphanage from the 1940s to the 1960s.

The church had claimed that the lay order of the Christian Brothers – which ran the orphanage – was independent. and therefore solely responsible for the sexual abuse of the boys by some members of the Irish Christian Brothers. But the archdiocese was held vicariously liable by the Newfoundland and Labrador Supreme Court of Appeal.

Open any parish website these days and you’ll see something like this: “URGENT: call for pledges to save St. Therese Parish, 2022,” followed by a link to a pledge sheet.

“We need to keep our weekly collections high enough to keep paying our monthly expenses. Thank you for increasing your weekly donations. You give us courage. With 15% of our bid, a tender proposal must be submitted to the trustee’s office in Halifax by noon on June 2, 2022,” the call reads.

“Proposals will be open this afternoon at 2 p.m. We should know if we are successful by June 16, 2022. At that time, we must have our full bid amount or lose the 15% deposit. A mortgage is highly unlikely.



Power has attended St. Teresa most of her life. Like any other church for the faithful, it is the place that marked all stages of life – weddings, baptisms and funerals.

“We will have to see where this leads. Nobody knows how this is going to end,” Power said.

“If we collect what we think is reasonable, then our committee will go to the parishioners and get their blessing. And if we succeed, then we have the church.

The volunteer committee and parishioners are nervous, he says.

“There’s really a lot of work going into it,” Power said.

“It’s an emotional state for everyone.”


“If we collect what we think is reasonable, then our committee will go to the parishioners and get their blessing. And if we succeed, then we have the church.
—Rick Power


Ron Ellsworth, a real estate agent (as well as a general councilor in St. John’s) sold residential properties for the church.

Some vacant land in the bidding process will appeal to developers, but Ellsworth said he doesn’t expect much upheaval on properties containing church structures when winning bids are announced. .

“I would be shocked if there were any major surprises for any of the parishes, to be honest,” he said.

Many properties are zoned institutional and, unlike an estate sale, there is no option in the bidding process for a rezoning condition, he noted.


Ron Elsworth.  -Keith Gosse
Ron Elsworth. -Keith Gosse

He also noted that there could be environmental issues for some properties and the high cost of repurposing some buildings will be a daunting task.

Corpus Christi is in a flood zone, as is its parking lot across the street.

And in smaller towns, local businesses are likely to be reluctant to buy under the church, Ellsworth said.

Geoff Budden, the victims’ lead lawyer – he won the case after more than two decades of work – said he hoped there would be an interim distribution to claimants by the end of 2022.

“That’s our goal,” he said.

The claims process is still being developed and will be finalized over the summer and fall.

The victims continue to come forward.


Some of the survivors of abuse at Mount Cashel await the start of legal proceedings in St. John's, 2019. - SaltWire Network File Photo
Some of the survivors of abuse at Mount Cashel await the start of legal proceedings in St. John’s, 2019. – SaltWire Network File Photo

As for the parishes, Budden noted that the process has given them several months this year, and all of 2021 (since the Supreme Court of Canada has refused to allow the archdiocese’s appeal to be heard).

“It was pretty clear since then, if not even before, that was how things were going to go,” he said.

On Tuesday, the Supreme Court of Newfoundland and Labrador ruled on a claim by the RC Episcopal Corp. to convert insolvency into the Companies’ Creditors Arrangement Act rather than the Bankruptcy and Insolvency Act. This loosens time restrictions.

It takes effect on May 17.

The victims’ legal team had opposed it, arguing that it was premature and would increase costs, thereby decreasing the funds available to distribute to them.

Budden said Tuesday’s court ruling — released Wednesday — isn’t expected to have a big impact on the survivors’ schedule, however.

Ernst and Young will continue to oversee the process.

]]>
Catholic Church will hold elected officials accountable for campaign promises https://garibaldirosario.org/catholic-church-will-hold-elected-officials-accountable-for-campaign-promises/ Wed, 11 May 2022 03:23:06 +0000 https://garibaldirosario.org/catholic-church-will-hold-elected-officials-accountable-for-campaign-promises/ National Director of Caritas Philippines and Bishop of Kidapawan Jose Colin Bagaforo. Photo courtesy of Caritas Philippines website The Catholic Church in the Philippines has pledged to continue its post-election agenda of holding newly elected leaders accountable to their campaign promises. National Director of Caritas Philippines and Bishop of Kidapawan, Jose Colin Bagaforo stressed that […]]]>

National Director of Caritas Philippines and Bishop of Kidapawan Jose Colin Bagaforo. Photo courtesy of Caritas Philippines website

The Catholic Church in the Philippines has pledged to continue its post-election agenda of holding newly elected leaders accountable to their campaign promises.

National Director of Caritas Philippines and Bishop of Kidapawan, Jose Colin Bagaforo stressed that people’s vigilance does not end with the election, but will continue throughout the tenure of elected government officials.

Bishop Bagaforo, who leads Halalang Marangal 2022, in addition to providing voter education and monitoring elections as part of the church’s program, also monitors the pledges of candidates who have signed a pact with the Catholic Bishops’ Conference of the Philippines (CBCP) Social action centers for good governance in various provinces.

“We will continuously publish, exhibit and disseminate information about their commitment programs and the agreements they have signed,” the Bishop said in a radio interview.

According to Bagaforo, these include the implementation of programs for the environment and respect for human rights.

“May we work together, work together and always for the greater well-being of our people and our country,” he added.

The Bishop said elected officials in government, as leaders of the country, have an obligation to deliver on their promises to the people, including advancing issues that are for the greater good.

Halalang Marangal 2022 is a “coalition of faith-driven organizations” committed to clean, accurate, accountable and transparent elections.


]]>
Chicago Catholic Church closes parishes to foster growth https://garibaldirosario.org/chicago-catholic-church-closes-parishes-to-foster-growth/ Mon, 09 May 2022 11:00:00 +0000 https://garibaldirosario.org/chicago-catholic-church-closes-parishes-to-foster-growth/ Tom Gull knows the Catholic Church in Chicago has a business problem. A lifelong Catholic, Gull sings in the Oak Park Ascension Choir every Sunday. He served as the parish’s business manager for nine years, during which he wrote a small booklet offering advice to other parishes on how to navigate the changing financial landscape […]]]>

Tom Gull knows the Catholic Church in Chicago has a business problem.

A lifelong Catholic, Gull sings in the Oak Park Ascension Choir every Sunday. He served as the parish’s business manager for nine years, during which he wrote a small booklet offering advice to other parishes on how to navigate the changing financial landscape as church attendance declines.

“I just started thinking – what are the different activities – I hate to say business practices, but business,” Gull paused. “There is no better word. You know, business practices, how do you apply them to the church? »

Such credentials made Gull an ideal candidate to participate in the “renew my church” effort.

Announced by the Archdiocese of Chicago five years ago, “Renew My Church” assessed the strengths of the church and how to streamline the organization as attendance dwindled and financial pressures increased. No option has been left out: some parishes have closed, some have merged, and others have been turned into mission sites that are no longer used for Mass.

The archdiocese has created 100 such groups across the region to decide the future of their parishes. A pastor would invite five or six parishioners, like Gull, to join the team, and the archdiocese would send representatives to follow up with the respective task forces.

Tom Cull is one of many local Catholics who have participated in the Archdiocese’s “Renew My Church” task forces. Manuel Martinez / WBEZ

The results of the 100 working groups are expected by the end of the month. The archdiocese has so far reduced the number of parishes from 350 to 247, but the process has drawn mixed emotions for Catholics in the region. Some felt a sense of hope for the potential for renewal in their parish; others felt lost after their usual place of worship closed.

This was especially true for communities of color on the south side of Chicago. According to data from the 2020 census, seven South Side neighborhoods saw double-digit percentage declines in population. These large-scale demographic changes made it difficult for the Catholic Church to continue to operate parishes in these areas.

Father Jason Malave, a liaison for Cardinal Blase Cupich who works directly on Renew My Church, acknowledged that the Catholic Church in the region has a resource problem.

“I think the structural renewal was quite clear in that the number of priests…did not increase. The number of faithful at Mass does not increase. People’s generosity to their parishes was not increasing,” Malave said. “The only thing that was increasing was the amount of money it cost to maintain the buildings on all the campuses we happened to be serving people on.”

While parish working groups made suggestions, the archdiocese had the final say. Gull said he was pleased with the results of his task force – his parish will be joined with neighboring St. Edmund Parish to form Ascension and St. Edmund Parish, operating on a combined budget.

But east of him, Catholics like Rosie Dominguez in Pilsen are devastated.

“I feel like because of the closure of my parish, it affected my faith,” Dominguez said, wiping away a tear. “I feel lost.”

Dominguez was a longtime parishioner at St. Adalbert before it closed in 2019. An archdiocesan document states that Sunday Mass attendance at the church dropped by 72% between the years 2000 and 2015.

Additionally, the church building itself is in “a very dangerous state of repair,” according to the document. Dominguez said parishioners had wanted to raise funds and volunteer their skills to repair the building’s edifice, but the archdiocese says neither he nor the parish can afford the $3 million in repairs needed.

The closure has been a major ordeal for Dominguez as she hops from parish to parish for Sunday services.

“Once in a while I go to St. Agnes on the 26th and Central Park because that’s the closest,” Dominguez said. “But I’ve tried St. Pius, I’ve been to St. Procopius, I’ve been to St. John Cantius, and it doesn’t feel right to me.”

Although he does not feel “at home” in any of these parishes, Dominguez continues to go to mass.

“I’ll have conversations with my dad and he’ll be like, ‘Rosie, you know the church is just the body of the people.’ And I’m like, ‘I get that, but – like yeah, I know I can worship somewhere else,’ she said. ‘But it’s just not the same thing.’

In some parishes, there is no single narrative on which the participants and the archdiocese agree. Take St. Thomas More in Wrightwood-Ashburn – the parish will become a canonical mission – a designation that means the church will not offer the full range of ministry services.

St. Thomas More, the church Kelly Smith (right) attends, will no longer offer the full range of ministry services as the archdiocese consolidates its resources.
Manuel Martinez/WBEZ

While the archdiocese mentioned the parish failed to reach the largely African-American surrounding area, parishioner Kelly Smith said congregants made efforts in this regard. And now she wonders where the money the parish has raised to stay open will go.

“It just sows deep distrust as everyone wonders, all this money that’s been raised, all these goals, where is all this money going?” said Smith. “All these properties in good condition, what will happen to them? There are so many unanswered questions and there is absolutely no transparency.

Malave said the archdiocese has been transparent and if some people feel left out, it may be because their respective parishes were not communicating well with their congregations.

“There are parishes that have done extraordinarily well, and there are parishes that maybe haven’t gotten the word out well enough,” Malave said. “Maybe it was during COVID, or maybe people weren’t aware at the time of the meaning or reality of the pending or possible changes.”

Although some shutdowns and mergers can be emotionally difficult for some people, Malave said it’s time to move on.

The second installment of Renew My Church focuses on the spiritual revitalization of parishes, which he says will help avoid the problem that forced the Catholic Church to close some of its doors in the first place: empty pews.

Adora Namigadde is a metro reporter for WBEZ. Am here @adorakn.

Editor’s note: An earlier version of this story said that St. Thomas More no longer offered masses. The parish may offer Mass, but no longer offers the full range of ministry services.

]]>